Skin Cancer

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Alcohol, alcoholic beverages, and melanoma risk: a systematic literature review and dose-response meta-analysis.

Frequent intake of alcohol correlates with high risk of melanoma.

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Alcohol drinking and cutaneous melanoma risk: a systematic review and dose-risk meta-analysis.

Alcohol consumers may have a high propensity to develop cutaneous melanoma, the most aggressive type of skin cancer.

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Sildenafil use and increased risk of incident melanoma in US men: a prospective cohort study.

​Regular users of sidenafil (viagra) may have a high risk of developing melanoma.

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Alcohol Intake and Risk of Incident Melanoma: A Pooled Analysis of Three Prospective Studies in the United States.

​Regular drinking of alcoholic beverages may facilitate the development of melanoma, particularly in areas of the body protected from ultraviolet rays.

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Alcohol consumption and risk of melanoma among women: pooled analysis of eight case-control studies.

Women who are frequent consumers of alcohol may be more prone to develop melanoma.

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Recent Comments
Marky Yvanovich
This is inline with a recent video I saw on nutritionfacts.org concerning antioxidant levels and how they can protect against sunb... Read More
Wednesday, 28 June 2017 10:13
Sean Carney
Now that is an interesting question for sure. :-)
Wednesday, 28 June 2017 11:21
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A randomized, 12-year primary-prevention trial of beta carotene supplementation for nonmelanoma skin cancer in the physician's health study.

Regular intake of beta-carotene supplements may have no preventive effect on nonmelanoma skin cancer, including basal and squamous cell carcinoma.

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Antioxidant Supplementation Increases the Risk of Skin Cancers in Women but Not in Men.

Prolonged use of antioxidant supplements, such as beta-carotene, selenium, zinc, and Vitamins C and E may raise the odds of developing skin cancer in adult females.

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