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Red Meat Consumption and Risk of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in a Population With Low Meat Consumption: The Golestan Cohort Study

Generous intake of red and organ meat may favor the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

This study examined whether fondness for meat can increase an individual's chances of developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). A total of 1,612 men and women participated in this study. During the course of the study, 505 cases of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were recorded. 

Researchers found a high incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease among participants who enjoyed consuming red and organ meat. This study provides evidence that including more red and organ meat to our diet may be detrimental to our liver health.

Research Summary Information

  • 2021
  • Maryam Hashemian, Shahin Merat, Hossein Poustchi, Elham Jafari, Amir-Reza Radmard, Farin Kamangar, Neal Freedman, Azita Hekmatdoost, Mahdi Sheikh, Paolo Boffetta, Rashmi Sinha, Sanford M Dawsey, Christian C Abnet, Reza Malekzadeh, Arash Etemadi
  • Digestive Oncology Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Departments of Biology, School of Art and Sciences, Utica College, Utica, New York, USA; Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Biology, School of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences, Morgan State University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Metabolic Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; Departments of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Genetic Epidemiology Group, Section of Genetics, International Agency for Research on Cancer, the World Health Organization, Lyon, France; Stony Brook Cancer Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, USA; Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
  • No, Free full text of study was not found.
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