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Vegetable Diversity, Injurious Falls, and Fracture Risk in Older Women: A Prospective Cohort Study

Devout consumption of several types of vegetables may make an older woman less susceptible to fractures and other injuries from falls.

This study examined if eating different types of vegetables can significantly cut down the risk of injurious falls and fractures in elderly women. Researchers studied submitted food questionnaires and health records from 1,429 Australian women who were above the age of 69 years over a 14.5-year period. 

The researchers discovered that consuming adequate amounts of different varieties of vegetables protected older women from fractures and other injuries sustained from falls. This study recommended that "increasing vegetable diversity especially in older women with low vegetable intake may be an effective way to reduce injurious fall and fracture risk."

Research Summary Information

  • 2018
  • Marc Sim, Lauren C Blekkenhorst, Joshua R Lewis, Catherine P Bondonno, Amanda Devine, Kun Zhu, Richard J Woodman 13, Richard L Prince, Jonathan M Hodgson
  • School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. marc.sim@ecu.edu.au. Medical School, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. marc.sim@ecu.edu.au. School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. l.blekkenhorst@ecu.edu.au. Medical School, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. l.blekkenhorst@ecu.edu.au. School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. joshua.lewis@ecu.edu.au. Medical School, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. joshua.lewis@ecu.edu.au. Centre for Kidney Research, Children's Hospital at Westmead, School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2145, Australia. joshua.lewis@ecu.edu.au. School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. c.bondonno@ecu.edu.au. Medical School, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. c.bondonno@ecu.edu.au. School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. a.devine@ecu.edu.au. Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia. kun.zhu@uwa.edu.au. Medical School, Sir Charles Gairdner Unit, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia. kun.zhu@uwa.edu.au. Flinders Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA 5042, Australia. richard.woodman@flinders.edu.au. Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia. richard.prince@uwa.edu.au. Medical School, Sir Charles Gairdner Unit, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia. richard.prince@uwa.edu.au. School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. jonathan.hodgson@ecu.edu.au. Medical School, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. jonathan.hodgson@ecu.edu.au.
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
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