1 minute reading time (187 words)

Dietary antioxidants, fruits, and vegetables and the risk of Barrett's esophagus.

​Increasing the frequency of consumption of fruits, vegetables, and dietary antioxidants may help to prevent the development of Barrett's esophagus, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and esophageal cancer.

Barrett's esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are two conditions that promote the formation and growth of cancer cells in the esophagus. This study investigated how the ingestion of fruits and vegetables influences the risk of developing Barrett's esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease. The dietary habits and incidence of Barrett's esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease among more than 900 persons were assessed by validated food frequency questionnaires and hospital records respectively.

Researchers observed that individuals who reported consuming high amounts of fruits, vegetables, and antioxidants, including beta-carotene, vitamin C, and E, from food sources had better chances of avoiding both Barrett's esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease. In contrast, the use of antioxidant supplements was found to have no effect on Barrett's esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease risk in this study. The findings of this study add to the existing evidence that fruits, vegetables, and dietary oxidants may play a beneficial role in the prevention of Barrett's esophagus, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and esophageal cancer. 


Research Summary Information

The relationship between fruit and vegetable intak...
Fruit and vegetable intake and cognitive impairmen...

Related Posts

 

Comments (0)

Rated 0 out of 5 based on 0 voters
There are no comments posted here yet

Leave your comments

  1. Posting comment as a guest. Sign up or login to your account.
Rate this post:
Attachments (0 / 3)
Share Your Location

By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://www.drcarney.com/