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Association of habitual intake of fruits and vegetables with depressive symptoms: the AusDiab study

Following a diet rich in fruits and vegetables may brighten our chances of avoiding depression.

This study assessed the impact of eating different types of fruits and vegetables on the risk of depression. Researchers matched dietary patterns with the development of depressive symptoms among 4,105 Australian men and women above the age of 25 years.

Researchers found out that the likelihood of suffering depression decreased significantly with increase in the variety and frequency of fruits and vegetables consumed. Evidence from this study indicate that filling our plates with different types of fruits and vegetables may improve our odds of staying away from depression.

Research Summary Information

  • 2021
  • Simone Radavelli-Bagatini, Reindolf Anokye, Nicola P Bondonno, Marc Sim, Catherine P Bondonno, Mandy J Stanley, Craig Harms, Richard Woodman, Dianna J Magliano, Jonathan E Shaw, Robin M Daly, Jonathan M Hodgson, Joshua R Lewis, Lauren C Blekkenhorst
  • Institute for Nutrition Research, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia. s.radavellibagatini@ecu.edu.au. Institute for Nutrition Research, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia. Medical School, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia. School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia. School of Arts and Humanities, Psychology and Criminology, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia. Flinders Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia. Diabetes and Population Health, Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Clinical Diabetes and Epidemiology, Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition, School of Exercise and Nutrition Science, Deakin University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Centre for Kidney Research, Children's Hospital at Westmead, School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Contributed equally.
  • No, Free full text of study was not found.
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