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Soy intake and breast cancer risk: a prospective study of 300,000 Chinese women and a dose-response meta-analysis

Generous consumption of soy foods may help stave off breast cancer.

This study examined the influence of high dietary ingestion of soy foods on the incidence of breast cancer in Chinese women. Data from 300,000 women, of whom 2,289 eventually developed breast cancer, were analyzed to estimate the risk of breast cancer according to the frequency of consumption of soy foods. 

Researchers noted that as the rate of soy foods increased, the risk of breast cancer declined. Daily consumers of additional 10 mg of isoflavones from soy foods enjoyed a 3% reduction in the risk of breast cancer. The data from this study support the conclusion that high intake of soy foods may help combat the development of breast cancer.

Research Summary Information

  • 2020
  • Yuxia Wei, Jun Lv, Yu Guo, Zheng Bian, Meng Gao, Huaidong Du, Ling Yang, Yiping Chen, Xi Zhang, Tao Wang, Junshi Chen, Zhengming Chen, Canqing Yu, Dezheng Huo, Liming Li, China Kadoorie Biobank Collaborative Group
  • Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing, 100191, China. Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Peking University), Ministry of Education, Beijing, China. Peking University Institute of Environmental Medicine, Beijing, China. Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. Medical Research Council Population Health Research Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit (CTSU), Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. NCDs Prevention and Control Department, Maiji CDC, Tianshui, Gansu, China. China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing, China. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing, 100191, China. yucanqing@pku.edu.cn. Department of Public Health Sciences, The University of Chicago, 5841 S. Maryland Ave., MC2000, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA. dhuo@health.bsd.uchicago.edu.
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
Habitual consumption of soy protein and isoflavone...
Higher dietary soy intake appears inversely relate...

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