Plant-based diets and incidence of type 2 diabetes in US men and women: results from a cohort of 3 studies.

Low type 2 diabetes risk is associated with vegetarian diets.

This study was carried out to determine the correlation between plant-based dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes development risk in men and women. Using self-reported dietary assessment questionnaires, researchers evaluated the diets of 200,727 US men and women recruited from the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professional Follow-up Study. The type 2 diabetes mellitus hazard risk of each participant in this study was also assessed.

Researchers observed a low prevalence of type 2 diabetes among subjects who adhered to plant-based dietary patterns. High consumption of healthy plant foods, such as nuts, fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains, was found to diminish type 2 diabetes development risk significantly. The results of this study show that increased intake of vegetarian diets may be beneficial in the prevention of type 2 diabetes.

Research Summary Information

  • 2016
  • Ambika Satija, Shilpa N. Bhupathiraju, Eric B. Rimm, Donna Spiegelman, Stephanie E. Chiuve, Lea Borgi, Walter C. Willett, JoAnn E. Manson, Qi Sun, and Frank B. Hu
  • Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America. Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America. Department of Global Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America. Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America. Renal Division, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America. Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America National Cancer Institute, UNITED STATES.
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
  • No source of funding disclosure found
  • No potential conflicts disclosure found
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