5 minutes reading time (1089 words)

Low-Carb Theory Regarding Meat/Insulin is Flawed

Low-Carb Theory Regarding Meat/Insulin is Flawed

Due to rising obesity and insulin resistance rates, low-carb and Paleo diets have become a popular approach to the growing population of overweight Americans. As stated by Dr. John McDougall, "Advocates of high-protein diets explain the reason people are fat is not because of the fat they eat, but because of hyperinsulinism and insulin resistance. Insulin encourages fat cells to store fat and prevents the release of fat from these cells. Therefore, high levels of insulin, known as hyperinsulinism, would be expected to promote obesity."

One high-protein, low-carb website, emphasizes that carbohydrates are the "root of all evil" when it comes to weight loss and health. Consequently, the majority of calories from a low-carb diet come from meat, which contains protein and fat, but no carbs.

Although carbs do make our insulin levels go up, Dr. Micheal Greger points out in the video above that scientists have known for over a half century that protein makes it go up as well. An "Insulin Index of Foods" was published in 1997 which listed 38 foods that produced higher insulin levels. This study and subsequent studies showed that any type of meat (beef, chicken, and pork) produced substantial insulin secretion. "In fact meat protein causes as much insulin release as pure sugar." Meat raised insulin levels higher than a large apple, a cup of oatmeal, a cup and a half of white flour pasta.

Insulin index of foods Size400

Below we've highlighted a few points from the Insulin Index:

  • "Some of the protein-rich foods (beef, cheese, eggs) had larger insulin responses per gram than did many of the foods consisting predominately of carbohydrate."
  • "Carbohydrate is not the only stimulus for insulin secretion." Protein-rich foods can also stimulate insulin secretion without increasing blood glucose concentrations. "A low-fat diet based on less-refined, carbohydrate-rich foods with relatively low insulin scores may help enhance satiety and aid weight loss as well as improve blood glucose and lipid control
  • "Pasta, oatmeal porridge and All-Bran cereal produced relatively low insulin responses despite their high carbohydrate contents.
  • Some protein and fat-rich foods (eggs, beef, fish, cheese, cake and doughnuts) induced as much insulin secretion as did some carbohydrate-rich foods. Beef was equal to brown rice and fish was equal to whole grain bread.)"

In regards to the above findings, Dr. Greger continues by saying, "So based on their own framework, if low-carb and Paleo people stuck to their own theory, and it's all about insulin - they would be out telling everyone to go vegetarian, as vegetarians have significantly lower insulin levels even at the same weight. Meat eaters have up to 50% higher insulin levels."

For example, if you put someone on a whole plant-food diet, "you can significantly bring their insulin levels down within just 3 weeks. And then just by adding egg whites back to the diet, you can boost insulin production 60% within 4 days. Even doubling someone's carbohydrate intake using lots of whole grains, beans, fruits and vegetables will bring their insulin levels down."

Meat insulin responseResized400Insulin Levels can Drop in as Little as One Week

We had the pleasure to work with a lovely lady named Jacquie at one of the Engine 2 Diet Immersions. Jacquie had suffered from type-2 diabetes for many years. After only one week of eating Plant-Strong her glucose level fell within the normal range for the very first time. Her emotional testimony brought tears to many eyes:

 

The Atkins and New Atkins Made Easy

Dr. Robert Atkins, creator of the popular low-carb, high-protein and fat diet, "died overweight with a history of heart attack, congestive heart failure and hypertension" according to the medical examiner. In an attempt to make the diet more healthful, proponents of the New Atkins Made Easy diet assumed that the revised diet would lower insulin levels. However, "No significant drop in insulin levels on very low carb diets" was found. What did rise, however was LDL cholesterol levels, which is the #1 risk factor for heart disease.

What About the Paleo Diet?

"The Paleo movement gets a lot of things right" Dr. Greger states. "They tell people to ditch dairy and doughnuts, eat lots of fruits, nuts and vegetables, and cut out a lot of processed junk." Dr. Greger's above video profiles a study regarding the Paleo diet and continues by saying, "They took a bunch young healthy folks put them on a Paleolithic diet along with a Crossfit-based, high-intensity circuit training exercise program. Now if you lose enough weight exercising you can temporarily drop your cholesterol levels no matter what you eat. You can see that with stomach stapling surgery, tuberculosis, chemo, a cocaine habit—just losing weight by any means can lower cholesterol, which makes these results all the more troubling. Ten weeks of hard core workouts and weight loss, and LDL cholesterol still went up. And it was even worse for those who started out the healthiest. Those starting out with excellent LDLs, under 70 had a 20% elevation in LDL, and their HDL dropped. The Paleo diet's deleterious impact on blood fats was not only significant, but substantial enough to counteract the improvements commonly seen with improved fitness and body composition. Exercise is supposed to make things better. Put people instead on a plant-based diet and a modest exercise program—mostly just walking-based, and within 3 weeks can drop their bad cholesterol 20%, and their insulin levels 30%, despite a 75-80% carbohydrate diet whereas the Paleo diets appeared to negate the positive effects of exercise."

For more information, click on the following links:

(1) High-protein Diets: Trading Your Health for Temporary Weight Loss

(2) Are all Carbs Bad?

(3) Weight Gain Attributed to Eating Meat

(4) Obesity-Causing Chicken Virus

(5) Obesity-Causing Pollutants in Food

(6) Chicken Big: Poultry and Obesity

(7) Die Sooner With Good Looking Numbers

(8) Meat Increases Risk of Diabetes

(9) Eggs and Diabetes

(10) Fish and Diabetes

(11) Dr. Carney's Animal-Based Diet Promotes Illness Pinterest Board

(12) Dr. Carney's Low-Carb Diet Pinterest Board

(13) An Insulin Index of Foods: The Insulin Demand Generated by 1000-kJ Portions of Common Foods in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1997, Vol. 66: pages 1264-1276 by Susanne HA Holt, Janette C. Brand Miller, and Peter Petocz.

Michael Greger MD Links

Scroll Down Page to Leave Comments

Starch-Smart Helpful Sharing Community Small Banner

What Have You Got to Lose?
Fight the Obesity Epidemic! We provide Starch-Smart Support through our Helpful Sharing Community, Discussion Forums, and Blogging Platform.

Super Bowl Food/Stress Can Trigger Heart Attacks
Are all Carbs Bad?

Related Posts

 

People in this conversation

Comments (38)

Rated 5 out of 5 based on 1 voters
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Quote from article :
Some protein and fat-rich foods (eggs, beef, fish, cheese, lentils, cake and doughnuts) induced as much insulin secretion as did some carbohydrate-rich foods

I dont think lentils should be included...this has to be an error

  James
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Hello James,

Good catch! Actually great minds must have been thinking alike because we thought the same thing yesterday and so watched the video again and did not find the mention of lentils. It has been removed now although you may have to refresh the cache in your web browser to get the corrected version to display.

Please do continue to check on our work and let us know if you ever again find something that does not seem to make sense to you!

Sean Carney

  Sean Carney
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

I recently saw a January 24 post in Health Issues where you shared that the insulin in the blood is as high or higher due to meat consumption compare to carbohydrate-rich foods.

Is the damage done by diabetes due to the insulin in the blood or the sugar. If it is the insulin, then it seems to me that we are measuring the wrong thing when we measure sugar instead of insulin levels. AS this article points out "Protein-rich foods can also stimulate insulin secretion without increasing blood glucose levels."

I would expect that blood glucose is easier and cheaper to analyse than insulin levels.

  Ray Hatch
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Animal proteins and fats both contribute to higher blood sugar levels through insulin resistance.

Bodies are damaged more by high levels of fasting blood glucose than by elevated insulin levels, yet both are measurements of concern.

That is why, when I order fasting blood tests on serum, I order tests of both glucose as well as fasting insulin.

On a practical level, testing finger-stick glucose each AM is much more valuable than waiting for the MD to order another fasting blood draw, which happens more rarely due to the expense to the patient.

Best Wishes as you seek to optimize fasting blood glucose readings with a low-fat, oil-free vegan diet of whole unprocessed foods. You may also enjoy my powerpoint presentation on diabetes, which can be viewed here:
https://www.veggievore.com/streaming

Sincerely,
Dr. Carney

  Comment was last edited about 3 years ago by Site Admin Linda Carney MD
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

My personal experience with Type-1 diabetes has illuminated the issue from another perspective: Instead of foods elevating blood-sugar and/or insulin; the food damages the system compromising its ability to regulate. I have learned that the metabolic system is a very complex machine involving almost all organs of the body all working together for a very tight regulation of blood-sugar. When all of these elements are working unimpeded, it is virtually impossible to induce a blood-sugar spike even after consuming a very high dose of sugar. After decades of personal experimentation, I found that fats and animal sourced products damages the elements of the metabolic system, thus any elevation of blood-sugar or insulin is an indication of system damage or compromise (at best). I have also learned that the percentage of the population with a compromised metabolic system is so high it is universally considered "normal". This results in misleading metrics such as the "Glycemic Index".
The good news! - in most cases, a damaged system will heal when the damaging foods are eliminated.

  Comment was last edited about 3 years ago by Ken Thomas Ken Thomas
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Wow Ken,
Thank you for that extremely helpful perspective and addition to this conversation. So glad to hear from you!
Sean

  Sean Carney
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Why did you include this graph from the study in your blog post and not the other one that was in the study?

  BillyHW
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Hello BillyHW,

I would like to encourage you to create an account on this site so that we can be sure you will be informed when there are responses to your questions. I suspect you noticed in the full study that there were quite a few charts and graphs. We did not try to grab all of them to include in this blog.

  Comment was last edited about 2 years ago by Sean Carney Sean Carney
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

I believe your article misrepresents how Atkins's died. Please see:

https://www.verywellfit.com/how-did-atkins-die-2241657

  Peter
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site
  Marky Yvanovich
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Thank you Dr. Linda Carney!

I believe this is true, because Dr. McDougall have lots of patients cured with starch diet. I started following it 2.9 years ago. I'm eating always how much I want (mostly rice and sweet potatoes, with some vegetables), but weight stays stable. In summer, when I'm walking more and do cycling, weight is near 75kg (165 lbs) In winter time when I'm having little physical activity (3 km daily walk usually) it's bit higher, but weight gain slows and stops when it has been raised to certain level: It's currently 80 kg (176 lbs) and was month ago too.

I love starch based diet because it gives energy and good mood and I'm not tired oftenly, what It was previously. I'm 39 years old.

  Comment was last edited about 1 year ago by Sean Carney Erkki Pilving
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Erkki,

We are thrilled to have you here and so happy that you are seeing positive results living Starch-Smart. :-)

Sean

  Sean Carney
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

You're doing the whole world a disservice cherry-picking the one graph that may or may not prove your point. In this example, it would have been honest to post this graph...

https://www.lchf-rd.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Insulin-Index-38-foods.png

...and discuss the fact that low fat high carb foods like the one you (and Greger, and others) constantly promote, elevate BOTH insulin and glucose, albeit temporarily. Of course potatoes, bread, rice shoot blood sugar into diabetic levels. Of course this is heavily damaging to arteries, hair, microcirculation, organs, neuropathy... fasted levels do NOT detect this.

The graph you decided to share discusses "insulin AUC / glucose AUC". What an obvious bias. I'm sure you understand what the difference is between both graphs, but you are misleading readers who do not have a scientific background to get the nuance. What you could have said, while not being dishonest, was the following: "very lean beef and fish samples like those chosen in this study, cause a large insulin elevation without elevating blood glucose". That means that if anything, these people had a disproportional insulin spike (bad, avoid it with fattier cuts, or...

You're doing the whole world a disservice cherry-picking the one graph that may or may not prove your point. In this example, it would have been honest to post this graph...

https://www.lchf-rd.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Insulin-Index-38-foods.png

...and discuss the fact that low fat high carb foods like the one you (and Greger, and others) constantly promote, elevate BOTH insulin and glucose, albeit temporarily. Of course potatoes, bread, rice shoot blood sugar into diabetic levels. Of course this is heavily damaging to arteries, hair, microcirculation, organs, neuropathy... fasted levels do NOT detect this.

The graph you decided to share discusses "insulin AUC / glucose AUC". What an obvious bias. I'm sure you understand what the difference is between both graphs, but you are misleading readers who do not have a scientific background to get the nuance. What you could have said, while not being dishonest, was the following: "very lean beef and fish samples like those chosen in this study, cause a large insulin elevation without elevating blood glucose". That means that if anything, these people had a disproportional insulin spike (bad, avoid it with fattier cuts, or eggs or cheese) followed with a drop in blood sugar. Whereas many of your beloved plants induce both a glucose rollercoaster AND a (proportional) insulin spike.

It doesn't require a phD to understand that both stable blood sugar & insulin are optimal for human health. High fat carnivores not only observe a rapid decrease in fasted blood glucose and insulin, they also reverse and cure multiple immunity related conditions. Joe Rogan reversing his vitiligo is just another example of what's seen in thousands of anecdotal reports. But that is another debate.

Read More
  Ben Aoao
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Ben Aoao - -
You couldn't be more wrong. But you sound convinced so I hope it works for you.

  Vikki C Deedrick
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

It seems to me that people who are insulin resistant have problems when they eat carbohydrates. But, that problem goes away once they become insulin sensitive. However, as long as those people keep eating animal protein and fat, they remain insulin resistant. There are plenty of studies, blogs and articles on this site that demonstrate how this works. Eating animal foods may appear to be making them well (false security) but the moment they are given some healthy complex carbohydrates to eat, they begin to have problems again. The solution is not more meat. The solution is no meat and more whole plant based foods. Once the animal foods and refined oils are completely removed from the diet, the body heals itself, they become insulin sensitive and the complex carbohydrates no longer cause the insulin spikes.

  Comment was last edited about 5 months ago by Sean Carney Sean Carney
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Yep, there is copious evidence that low carb, high fat is the best. There is also copious evidence that the keto diet is the best, or a low-fat high carb diet is the best, etc. etc. etc. All with very convincing gurus promoting each. Obviously, they can't all be right. Most are polar opposites. So how on earth can anyone be sure what is real?

As an electronics design engineer, physics is paramount to my profession. In this profession I learned that evidence is never proof of anything, regardless of the number of examples or how long the evidence has been gathered. Evidence is valuable, but it is never proof. Proof of anything is in the "nuts and bolts" mechanics of the mechanism. Evidence alone is almost always misleading because there are always too many outcome affecting variables that we are oblivious to. This is especially true in any closed-loop control system, which includes everything biology. Believing in something because it seems intuitive is even below evidence.

Coupling the beyond-imagination complexity of biology being presented in simple terms with all the evidence and all the gurus essentially guarantees mass confusion and rigid opinions.

One of my duties as...

Yep, there is copious evidence that low carb, high fat is the best. There is also copious evidence that the keto diet is the best, or a low-fat high carb diet is the best, etc. etc. etc. All with very convincing gurus promoting each. Obviously, they can't all be right. Most are polar opposites. So how on earth can anyone be sure what is real?

As an electronics design engineer, physics is paramount to my profession. In this profession I learned that evidence is never proof of anything, regardless of the number of examples or how long the evidence has been gathered. Evidence is valuable, but it is never proof. Proof of anything is in the "nuts and bolts" mechanics of the mechanism. Evidence alone is almost always misleading because there are always too many outcome affecting variables that we are oblivious to. This is especially true in any closed-loop control system, which includes everything biology. Believing in something because it seems intuitive is even below evidence.

Coupling the beyond-imagination complexity of biology being presented in simple terms with all the evidence and all the gurus essentially guarantees mass confusion and rigid opinions.

One of my duties as an electronics design engineer is "reverse engineering". Reverse engineering is to take an unknown device; trace out the circuit, analyze the components to determine its purpose, function and operating parameters. This process is also used in design review meetings where you are given the design documents (created by its design engineer) minus any explanation of the design's purpose or operation. Using reverse engineering to determine the circuits function is very powerful in finding any design flaws. It's almost "proof" of the design integrity, prior to building the prototype.

In 1989 I became a type-1 diabetic (T1D). Just to be clear, it should be noted that type-1 diabetes is the loss of pancreatic beta cells that produce insulin - effectively, they are amputated by the immune system. This means any insulin in my body has to be put there by injection (by me - so I know exactly what my insulin levels are). The loss of automatic insulin levels results in an "open" metabolic control system requiring manual control.

The early experience of the diabetes was a powerful realization that I am not a very brave man. The diagnosis - along with the symptoms and prognosis were terrifying to me. Especially after realizing that my diagnosing doctor, nor the hospital staff had even a faint clue how to deal with T1D. I desperately did not want to be diabetic.

As soon as I was discharged from the hospital, I hurried over to the university library to study the biology of metabolism. I wasn't interested in learning what was necessary for a degree, I just wanted to understand the "nuts and bolts" mechanics of metabolism. I wanted to study the low-level element of the issue - at the cellular / chemical level. I knew that higher (system) level information was subject to opinion. I also found that diabetic publications / organizations; such as the American Diabetes Association did not provide any information that would take the fear out of my prognosis. I found such association offerings were commercially oriented.

I was born, grew up and was living in "backwoods" Texas ranch country. I never knew anything about "diets". I didn't know there was any diet other than the common beef and other meats found in Texas ranch country. I had never even heard the word, "vegan". I was living in an information desert.

It seemed natural to me to apply "reverse engineering" efforts to fully understand my T1D. With that, I started a mono diet and a log to track the effects. I ate only one food item for however long it took to log a stable result (days to weeks). I logged the amount eaten, required insulin, timing, energy levels, how I felt, activities, etc. Then on to the next. After testing all the available food items, I started to mix foods to note any interactions. This process lasted for more than a year, but within a few months, a trend started to materialize which was very perplexing. It was common knowledge in my cattle community that humans had to eat meat, but my log results indicated something very different. I learned that any animal product and especially any fat elevated the floor of my glucose and insulin curve, meaning that any sugar spike had a higher starting point. With a lower floor, the same size spike could be lowered to less than 100mg/dl - inside the non-diabetic normal range. This seemed scary to me because if I want to be able to control my T1D to non-diabetic normal levels I could not eat any meat or fat - something I believed was required.

I found that the effect duration of fat and all animal sourced foods had a very slow onset; 24 to 48 hours and a very long duration; 30 or more days on the insulin curve floor. This means that if I eat any fat or animal product within 30 days the duration overlaps and extends another 30 days, and so on. Without my log I would have never figured that out. I would have just thought that was the natural floor of the curve and was as low as it gets. I later learned that the insulin curve floor was an element of Insulin Resistance which is caused by fat impeding glucose transfer to the mitochondria at the cellular level. Not only does this resist insulin transfer, it also delays transfer which slides metabolic processes out of sync with all the metabolic control signals. This is not personal or genetic, it is chemical physics.

As testing continued to confirm, I got braver and more confident to eliminate fats and animal products. Within a few months, my insulin curve floor became astonishingly low. I then found that with it that low, I could easily maintain my blood-sugar within my new limits of 70 mg/dl to 100 mg/dl (an A1C of 4.5). A little better that most non-diabetics. (And by the way, these are peak numbers, not just fasting.) As I continued on my low fat, high carbohydrate diet centered as much on whole foods as possible, my general health, fitness, stamina and muscle strength began a lifelong ascent. Throughout these past 31 years I still log everything and keep fine-tuning my diet; lower fat, more whole plant foods, etc. The result is that now at the age of 67 years old, I am lighter with more strength, more energy, more stamina, more agility and feel better than I did in my 20's or any previous time in my life.

Please pardon the length of this, but I would like to add that the profession of design engineering has taught me to always be skeptical of any claims and to never believe any guru, regardless of the guru's popularity or authority status or how much evidence they present. I will only believe them if what they say matches the "nuts and bolts" level mechanism of action. I don't mean to say that I am an expert or know any more than anyone else, I just mean to say that those are the rules of my personal belief system.

With my studies, experimentation results and observations, I am convinced that humans are indeed herbivores.

Read More
  Comment was last edited about 5 months ago by Ken Thomas Ken Thomas
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Ken Thomas, I found it so interesting to learn how you analyzed your food effects on your blood sugar/insulin needs. I am curious about potatoes. Do you eat them regularly? I spoke to Cyrus of Mastering Diabetes recently and he said that his coaching program advises diabetics can eat potatoes without an issue. I ask this because I believe some docs in the WFPB community seem to suggest eating sweet potatoes over non sweet potatoes because they are lower on the GI. Cyrus mentioned that the GI shouldn't be the only factor considered since when plant-based eaters eat higher GI foods, they typically are combining foods that contain fiber so the real result of the time of digestion is slower than if the food was eaten alone. What do you think of this from your experience?

  Denise Rose
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Hi Denise,

Thanks for asking. Yes! I eat potatoes. All types, any types. One of my routine favorites is the Russet, but I also routinely have Reds, Yukon Gold and I love all sweet potatoes. The Hawaiian purple potato is an over-the-top favorite. Too bad they are so hard to get.

I don't pay any attention to glycemic index. Doesn't really make a significant difference. I have found that the glucose absorption / decay rate of potatoes tracks with my insulin action rate more closely than most other foods. Potatoes are also low in fat keeping glucose, insulin and metabolism in sync. That is why potatoes are my daily staple food. I can eat a whole Jason's Deli large (actually its gargantuan) Russet with no blood-sugar spike. Of course, no toppings of any kind. I like the real taste of the potato. I feel that adding a topping is like drawing a mustache on a Mona Lisa painting. It's already perfect. Adding anything is a negative.

  Comment was last edited about 4 months ago by Ken Thomas Ken Thomas
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Ken, so interesting to hear.... Could you help me understand better what it means to say: " I have found that the glucose absorption / decay rate of potatoes tracks with my insulin action rate more closely than most other foods. Potatoes are also low in fat keeping glucose, insulin and metabolism in sync." I have a sense of what that means but would like to know more fully. Thanks!

  Denise Rose
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Hi Denise,

I'll give it a try...
Everything that is eaten and digested enters the blood stream and dissipates at a rate that can be plotted on a curve. The curve plots the rise rate, peak level and fall rate. When I say everything, I mean all the minerals, liquids, lipids, fats, proteins sugars, etc. Of interest in the passage of your question is glucose and insulin.

For me, insulin is injected subcutaneously and enters the bloodstream through capillaries in the skin. The rate of the injected insulin entering the vascular system and its effect on blood-sugar can also be plotted on a curve. Glucose entering the blood stream from digestion causes a blood-sugar rise. Insulin signals metabolic consumption ("burning") of the glucose (blood-sugar) causing it to fall. If the glucose and insulin curves were exactly matched, there would be no change in blood-sugar level. What I am saying is that the glucose curve from digesting potatoes more closely matches my insulin curve than most other foods.

The passage; "... low in fat keeping glucose, insulin and metabolism in sync" is referring to metabolisms set of complex balances. Metabolism is the "burning" of fuel (glucose) to produce...

Hi Denise,

I'll give it a try...
Everything that is eaten and digested enters the blood stream and dissipates at a rate that can be plotted on a curve. The curve plots the rise rate, peak level and fall rate. When I say everything, I mean all the minerals, liquids, lipids, fats, proteins sugars, etc. Of interest in the passage of your question is glucose and insulin.

For me, insulin is injected subcutaneously and enters the bloodstream through capillaries in the skin. The rate of the injected insulin entering the vascular system and its effect on blood-sugar can also be plotted on a curve. Glucose entering the blood stream from digestion causes a blood-sugar rise. Insulin signals metabolic consumption ("burning") of the glucose (blood-sugar) causing it to fall. If the glucose and insulin curves were exactly matched, there would be no change in blood-sugar level. What I am saying is that the glucose curve from digesting potatoes more closely matches my insulin curve than most other foods.

The passage; "... low in fat keeping glucose, insulin and metabolism in sync" is referring to metabolisms set of complex balances. Metabolism is the "burning" of fuel (glucose) to produce energy. Metabolism is the most efficient when metabolic actions occur in step with the control signals. Control signals are a complex mix of signals from all organs of the body communicating metabolic requirements. Fat increases insulin resistance by congesting the glucose path through the cell walls which increases the time between the control signals and the resulting metabolic action. The shorter the delay, the more in sync the metabolism is. The more in sync, the greater the efficiency. The more efficient, the less insulin is required, and the more energy is produced per given glucose "burned". The more in-sync the metabolism, the tighter, more stable is the blood-sugar control as well as all other biological systems. It could be said that blood-sugar levels is a product of metabolism and any out of range blood-sugar means a compromised metabolic system. Maintaining a healthy (in sync) metabolism results in steady, normal blood-sugar. Imagine if you turned the steering wheel on your car, but the car turned sometime later. That's the effect of insulin resistance on metabolism. Delays causes all kinds of problems!

Note that it is possible to have "normal" blood-sugar levels even with a compromised metabolic system. For example; a low-carb diet will mask an insulin resistance condition. Much like a car with a delayed steering condition would be masked by only driving on straight roads. Likewise, a fasting blood-sugar test will not reveal insulin resistance, unless it is extreme. A glucose tolerance test would be a better indicator.

Please let me know if that answers your question and if not, what part needs more explanation. Hopefully, I didn't go off on a tangent!

Thanks,
Ken

Read More
  Ken Thomas
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Ken, Thanks much for your reply. Love your metaphor of turning the steering wheel and especially for those diabetics who are just managing the disease and not reversing it (type 2) masking it by driving on straight roads only.

I find this so interesting about the potato because I'm sure the average person thinks its deadly for a diabetic. And I recognize most have no understanding of the role of fat in this disease.

From your experience of knowedge, do you find other diabetics who are not eating much fat have the same experience with white potatoes? I think it's great that you have found you can eat potatoes with no issue because they are just so delicious and satisfying.

  Denise Rose
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Hi Denise,

To your question, "...do you find other diabetics who are not eating much fat have the same experience with white potatoes?" Yes, however, it should be clarified that type-1 diabetics (T1D) metabolic system is the same as any non-diabetic with the only exception of loss of ability to produce insulin. It would be like someone who has an amputated hand. All the rest of their body is completely normal, like everyone else's, but they may need to compensate for the missing hand. The only difference between a T1D and everyone else is that they must inject insulin that would otherwise be automatic. That means two important things: 1) insulin resistance presents the same issue for non-diabetics exactly the same as for T1D's. The only difference is that the T1D has to deal with it manually where the non-diabetic is oblivious because their system deals with it automatically. Non-diabetics are oblivious because the time-lag is beyond human's natural attention span. However, the detriment is exactly the same for both. 2) Since a T1D has lost a vital metabolic control signal (insulin) they must then provide that signal manually. Everything else is normal. That means that...

Hi Denise,

To your question, "...do you find other diabetics who are not eating much fat have the same experience with white potatoes?" Yes, however, it should be clarified that type-1 diabetics (T1D) metabolic system is the same as any non-diabetic with the only exception of loss of ability to produce insulin. It would be like someone who has an amputated hand. All the rest of their body is completely normal, like everyone else's, but they may need to compensate for the missing hand. The only difference between a T1D and everyone else is that they must inject insulin that would otherwise be automatic. That means two important things: 1) insulin resistance presents the same issue for non-diabetics exactly the same as for T1D's. The only difference is that the T1D has to deal with it manually where the non-diabetic is oblivious because their system deals with it automatically. Non-diabetics are oblivious because the time-lag is beyond human's natural attention span. However, the detriment is exactly the same for both. 2) Since a T1D has lost a vital metabolic control signal (insulin) they must then provide that signal manually. Everything else is normal. That means that whatever a T1D's blood-sugar is at any time, whether it is what they intended or not - it is what they made it. This is why I do not believe that a T1D's management scheme can be successfully controlled by doctor's orders. Metabolic control is by the minute, variable by life. It is not something that can be prescribed every few months. The T1D must know how to manage it themselves in real time.

While I have known of some T1D's living on low-fat, they are very, very few. Most T1D's that I know are also type-2 because of the "prescribed" low-carb diet and fooled by the apparent benign-ness of fat. Trying to control T1D with the delays of insulin resistance is overwhelmingly difficult. Much like trying to drive through that crowded, complex and busy city of life in the car with delayed steering. I don't think a perfectly straight road of life is an option for anyone. This is why almost all T1D's leave their control up to a doctor and then assume the resulting issues is just because T1D is such a "devastating disease".

Read More
  Ken Thomas
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Ken, I love learning from you! Maybe you can share something else. It seems that a goal for a diabetic is to inject enough insulin to work, but not too much to get unwanted effects. So diet makes a difference on the amount of insulin needed. I understand that if someone eats a WFPB low fat diet their insulin needs are lower than if one is consuming animal products and higher fat content. So is there a recommended range of insulin to shoot for that is enough but not too much? What would that be? I assume body size might make a difference here...

  Denise Rose
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Thanks Denise,

Your question: "... is there a recommended range of insulin to shoot for that is enough but not too much?"

While that is indeed the goal of traditional medicine, it is not mine. The traditional approach is a focus on prescribed insulin dose and carbohydrate restriction. This is my "beef" with traditional medicine in T1D control. The problem is that metabolism is too variable for a "prescription" (Metabolism is really what is being managed. Blood-sugar is a side effect of metabolism). this is why I believe the individual must control their own metabolism (blood-sugar). There are far too many variables involved for any recommend insulin dose range. It should be noted that insulin is not a drug, it is a control hormone. It varies dramatically throughout a day, minute by minute.

To determine my insulin dose, I maintain a continuous running log. I enter data including each injection, everything I eat, the time and other related data. I use the log for pattern tracking. There are so many variables that determines the dose. For example, the previous insulin injection always has a percentage of effect overlapping the current one. It's also affected by the activity...

Thanks Denise,

Your question: "... is there a recommended range of insulin to shoot for that is enough but not too much?"

While that is indeed the goal of traditional medicine, it is not mine. The traditional approach is a focus on prescribed insulin dose and carbohydrate restriction. This is my "beef" with traditional medicine in T1D control. The problem is that metabolism is too variable for a "prescription" (Metabolism is really what is being managed. Blood-sugar is a side effect of metabolism). this is why I believe the individual must control their own metabolism (blood-sugar). There are far too many variables involved for any recommend insulin dose range. It should be noted that insulin is not a drug, it is a control hormone. It varies dramatically throughout a day, minute by minute.

To determine my insulin dose, I maintain a continuous running log. I enter data including each injection, everything I eat, the time and other related data. I use the log for pattern tracking. There are so many variables that determines the dose. For example, the previous insulin injection always has a percentage of effect overlapping the current one. It's also affected by the activity throughout the day. It's affected by foods eaten earlier in the day and even foods eaten weeks (or more) ago. The dose is affected by timing, expected activities, stored glycogen and current insulin resistance. The log data is used to determine the current dose against the food, time, activity and previous pattern. My interest is what is needed for that particular dose, never any standard recommendation. My goal is to maintain blood-sugar minimum and maximum peak levels (70 mg/dl to 100 mg/dl), at all times, as opposed to any target insulin level. Doses can vary from 3 units or less to 15 units or more. I take a minimum of five doses per day.

I hope this makes at least some sense. It is hard to condense my method into a comment or summary and it still make sense.

Because I have never known anyone else using this method and have never seen it presented from any source, I have decided to write it in a book. The title of the book is "Synchronous Push-Pull Type-1 Diabetes Control - The Non-Diabetic Diabetic Method". I am sad to say that it is taking much longer to finish the book than I ever imagined. I have given up on trying to predict its completion date. I'm just keeping at it and it will be done when it's done.

Read More
  Ken Thomas
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

That was a million dollar reply Ken. Thank you so much. I hope that many people are directed here by their search engines and find wisdom and courage through your reply!.

  Sean Carney
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

All long-lived healthy populations throughout the world consume HIGH CARB diets and are primarily plant-based. So, you’re off base, Ben. Look up the Blue Zones. These populations eating high carb/low to moderate fat diets have almost no diabetes, and low rates of heart disease and cancer. Although weight loss by any means will often improve health markers, high fat, meat-heavy diets are not healthy long term.

  Tanya Cleary
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Tanya, Thank you very much for your logical and balanced response. I am sorry that it took awhile for us to approve your comment. We approve comments from Guest posts because of the amount of spam comments that come through. But, we do not worry about approving comments from our members. Those post automatically. So you might want to consider becoming a member here at DrCarney.com (It's free) and coming to our rescue more often. :-)
Sean

  Sean Carney
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Ken,
Interesting again, your response and process. Curious, do you have any idea whether your method is similiar or different to what Robby and Cyrus teach as part of their Mastering Diabetes coaching?

  Denise Rose
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Hi Denise,

My method is different from Robby and Cyrus's method. From their website I gather that as with traditional methods, they count carbs and works to find the diabetic's insulin to carb ratio. I do neither. The similarity is the low-fat plant-based diet.

  Ken Thomas
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Ken, Thanks again for sharing your wisdom and the system that works for you.

  Denise Rose
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Something I would like to clarify about potatoes; I do not eat them because I can get away with it without too much issue with my diabetes. I eat them because they are an instrument of my diabetic control. In 1989, upon the terrifying onset and prognosis of my type-1 diabetes, and discovering that foods effect are paramount, I made a vow to never again eat anything for recreational purposes. Never to eat anything just because it was tasty or enjoyable. From that point on, everything I eat is entirely for the purpose of blood-sugar control. That remains true today. It sounds depriving, but it is not. As it turns out I greatly enjoy all the foods that are used for blood-sugar control including potatoes, grains, fruits, and vegetables. Enjoyment is a side-effect. But it is a really good side-effect!

  Ken Thomas
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Ken - - I LOVE your commitment.
And I am going to have to borrow your phrase - "never again eat anything for recreational purposes."
I hope you enjoy your good health for a very long time.

  Vikki C Deedrick
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Vikki,
Thanks for the kind words!

  Ken Thomas
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Well Ken, now you got me wondering again. Today I was teaching and talking about digestion and blood sugar control. I talked about intact grains vs more processed. So, curious, do you find better control with intact grains versus whole grain flours?

  Denise Rose
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Thanks Denise,

Intact grains. I avoid anything processed, including flours. The less processing the better the control. I think that just makes sense that natural (unprocessed) foods would be a better match to our natural biology.

  Ken Thomas
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Ken, Yes, intact grains. Your experience backs up the science. The more intact, the slower the blood sugar-insulin response.

Happy Eating Ken, for your health!

  Denise Rose
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Ken,
Thank you for your detailed comments on your Type 1 diabetes and how you control it! I've referred some of my patients to you - today, a gentleman who is a retired engineer and who has taken a renewed interest in controlling his type 2 diabetes. Reading your recent posts and answers to questions, I'm wondering what kind of control you have with legumes and if they have been helpful for control for you. Based on studies of groups of people, I've been highly recommending them for all of my patients, of course along with any and all fiber-filled foods. Just curious!

  Julia N Danforth
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Hi Julia and thank you for your interest in our DrCarney.com community!

Yes, legumes are a staple control food that I have every day. All types of beans / legumes are used except for high fat ones such as soy beans.

The key is low-fat; keeping the fat per total calories ratio below 10%. Calories is the common denominator- never grams!

Thanks again for joining us!

  Ken Thomas
There are no comments posted here yet

Leave your comments

  1. Posting comment as a guest. Sign up or login to your account.
Rate this post:
Attachments (0 / 3)
Share Your Location

By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://www.drcarney.com/