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Cruciferous and Allium Vegetable Intakes are Inversely Associated With 15-Year Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease Deaths in Older Adult Women.

​A significant reduction in atherosclerotic vascular disease mortality risk appear to be related to habitual consumption of cruciferous and allium vegetables in older women.

This study evaluated the correlation between the intake of cruciferous and allium vegetables and the likelihood of dying from atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD) in Australian women. Researchers from the University of Western Australia, Australia, tracked the diets and mortality records of 1,226 women aged 70 years and above for 15 years.

Researchers discovered that women who strictly adhered to a dietary pattern typified by high intake of allium and cruciferous vegetables had lower atherosclerotic vascular disease mortality risk than their counterparts on diets low on these vegetables. The consumption of an extra serving of cruciferous and allium vegetables per day was found to reduce the incidence of atherosclerotic vascular disease deaths in older women by 20%. Data from this study show that frequent consumption of cruciferous and allium vegetables may diminish an older woman's risk of dying from atherosclerotic vascular disease.

Research Summary Information

  • 2017
  • Blekkenhorst LC, Bondonno CP, Lewis JR, Devine A, Zhu K, Lim WH, Woodman RJ, Beilin LJ, Prince RL, Hodgson JM.
  • School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia lauren.blekkenhorst@research.uwa.edu.au. School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia. School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre Unit, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia. Centre for Kidney Research, Children's Hospital at Westmead, New South Wales, Australia. School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia. Renal Medicine Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia. Flinders Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
  • No. Source of funding disclosure not found
  • No. Potential conflicts disclosure not found
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