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Sugar- and Artificially Sweetened Beverages and the Risks of Incident Stroke and Dementia: A Prospective Cohort Study.

​A significant increase in the risk of stroke, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease is associated with high intake of artificially-sweetened beverages.

The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between the consumption of soft drinks and the occurrence of stroke and dementia in men and women. A team of scientists from the Boston University School of Medicine, USA, tracked the sugary beverage intake and the incidence rates of stroke, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease among 2,888 men and women above the age of 45 recruited from the Community-Based Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort.

The team of investigators found a high prevalence of stroke, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease among subjects who consistently consumed artificially-sweetened soft drinks. In contrast, generous consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages did not have any significant effect on stroke, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease risk in this study. The results of this study indicate that regular drinking of artificially-sweetened beverages may increase an individual's susceptibility to stroke, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease.

Research Summary Information

  • 2017
  • Pase MP, Himali JJ, Beiser AS, Aparicio HJ, Satizabal CL, Vasan RS, Seshadri S, Jacques PF.
  • From the Department of Neurology (M.P.P., J.J.H., A.S.B., H.J.A., C.L.S., S.S.) and Sections of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Department of Medicine (R.S.V), Boston University School of Medicine, MA; Framingham Heart Study, MA (M.P.P., J.J.H., A.S.B., H.J.A., C.L.S., R.S.V., S.S., P.F.J.); Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University of Technology, Australia (M.P.P.); Department of Biostatistics (J.J.H., A.S.B.) and Department of Epidemiology (R.S.V.), Boston University School of Public Health, MA; and Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA (P.F.J.). matthewpase@gmail.com. From the Department of Neurology (M.P.P., J.J.H., A.S.B., H.J.A., C.L.S., S.S.) and Sections of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Department of Medicine (R.S.V), Boston University School of Medicine, MA; Framingham Heart Study, MA (M.P.P., J.J.H., A.S.B., H.J.A., C.L.S., R.S.V., S.S., P.F.J.); Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University of Technology, Australia (M.P.P.); Department of Biostatistics (J.J.H., A.S.B.) and Department of Epidemiology (R.S.V.), Boston University School of Public Health, MA; and Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA (P.F.J.).
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
  • No. Source of funding disclosure not found
  • No. Potential conflicts disclosure not found
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