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The Effect of Different Oils on Endothelial Function

The Effect of Different Oils on Endothelial Function

Is there a "HEALTHY" oil? We've heard the term used so often that most of us believe there is such a thing. But which is it? Some tout olive oil because of its ancient Mediterranean roots. Others point to the long tradition of using soy products in Asia to prove the benefit of soybean oil. Still others recommend tropical oils because they have been used for centuries by Pacific Islanders. Can we rely on history to tell us which oils are best? What does science say about oil and health?

Here's a study that attempts to answer the question, "Do all oils affect us the same way?" Conducted in Colombia on ten healthy, young volunteers, the study compared the effects of olive, soybean, and palm oils, either fresh or after they'd been used for frying 10 or 20 times. The subjects were randomly fed potato soup that had 60ml of one of the types of oil added. The effects of the different oils were measured by performing flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) while fasting and again three hours after eating the oil-rich meal. Blood samples were also taken at these stages to determine lipid profiles and plasma glucose determinations. What happened? Endothelial function--the ability of the arteries to expand in response to nitric oxide--decreased 32% and triglyceride levels in the blood went up 27%. This acute adverse effect happened regardless of the type of oil used or whether the oil was fresh or had been used for frying. All oils caused the subjects' arteries to vasoconstrict temporarily while simultaneously raising their triglycerides.

This study is just one of many studies featured in the newly-created science section of DrCarney.com community. This section provides medical studies that will enable you to read for yourself what science teaches us about the relationship between diet and health. While I do believe that history has health lessons for us, I think that science helps us understand and apply the lessons from history. As an example, Jeff Novick, MS, RD, does a great job showing us the relationship between history, science, olive oil, and the Mediterranean Diet in the excerpt below taken from one of his lectures.

For myself and my patients, I've already looked at the science and made up my mind. Which oil is best? The oil that stays in the bottle on the grocery store shelf and away from my food is the best one for me! Oil is not a health food, no matter where its origin. Being of Italian descent, it took a lot for me to give up olive oil. But once my cholesterol started lowering and my asthma disappeared, I've never again considered adding olive oil back into my diet. (Well, except for that one time when I caved to family pressure and started wheezing within hours of that meal!) It takes courage to look at history honestly. It takes courage to face our cherished family comfort foods and examine them in the light of science. But improved health is available for those with the courage to read and apply the science.

For additional information, you might like:

(1) From Oil to Nuts

(2) Does Coconut Oil Lower Cholesterol?

(3) Show Me the Science: Endothelial Function

(4) Is Olive Oil Really Heart Healthy?

(5) Olive Oil not "Heart Healthy"

Jeff Novick, MS, RD, LD, LN Links

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Comments (9)

Rated 5 out of 5 based on 1 voters
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"Do all oils affect us the same way?"

NO.

Walnut oil is benificial.

 
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Hello Ruhl,

Thank you for taking the time to comment on our article. I would like to invite you to apply for an account here on DrCarney.com as opposed to posting as a guest so that we can be sure you receive notifications to replies. You can sign up at https://www.drcarney.com/club.

As Deborah has requested, I too would appreciate seeing the science behind your statement. The problem we have with all oils, including walnut oil, is that they are fats completely separated from their fiber. It makes sense to me that the oil as found IN the walnut could be beneficial whereas the oil as EXTRACTED FROM the walnut would have the same problems as other processed foods. For a great expose on what makes a food a processed food I would like to suggest you read Dr. Carney's blog titled Food Processing Made Simple. Let us know what you think of it.

  Comment was last edited about 3 months ago by Sean Carney
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Ruhl, would you provide a link to some peer-reviewed research to back-up your statement please? :-)

Please forgive me if my request seems picky or fussy. It's just that sometimes claims are sometimes based more on preference or belief than facts. We need to be careful about what to accept! I hope you understand. :-)

We can certainly agree that eating a few whole walnuts in a day may be beneficial in some ways, especially if eating the walnuts helps a person avoid eating animal products or junk food. However, the oil may be less beneficial since it is too easy to over-consume it and it has had many of the beneficial elements of whole nuts removed such as the fiber, protein & minerals.

Here is an example of a report based on peer-reviewed research. I hope you find this of interest. :-)
https://nutritionfacts.org/video/extra-virgin-olive-oil-vs-nuts/

 
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Nice comments Deborah and Sean.

An oil is a fat that has been separated from its fiber, thus rendering that oil an inflammatory product that concentrates many calories into a small volume that does not fill the stomach to provide satiety.

I agree that walnuts are the healthiest of all the nuts.

I do not feel that eating walnut oil would be better for anybody's health than eating walnuts would be.

I feel that there are many many patients who would be better off not eating walnuts more than once per month, if that.

Best Wishes,
Dr. Carney

 
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Just my two cents worth,

It seems very common to pursue certain foods for their health promoting elements. I suspect this is part of humanities constant quest for a "magic potion". Quite often, however, focusing on particular sought-after elements results in ignoring its detrimental elements. For illustration, there are many health promoting elements contained in toxicodendron radicans, also known as poison ivy. However, as we all know, along with all the good elements, it also contains some rather undesirable elements. (Interestingly, poison ivy is a member of the same family as cashews.)
During my thirty years of logging, charting and experimenting the effects of foods, I find fats to be one of the most socially prominent "magic potion" foods, yet it is also one of the most consequential (I'm not just talking about weight). Fats are the most concentrated of all food groups and all oils are isolated fats - 100% concentration. However, taking 24-48 hours for the threshold of effect, it is outside the human attention span, thus buried in the "noise" of all the other variables. One of the negative effects of all fats is insulin resistance, which slows and restricts all...

Just my two cents worth,

It seems very common to pursue certain foods for their health promoting elements. I suspect this is part of humanities constant quest for a "magic potion". Quite often, however, focusing on particular sought-after elements results in ignoring its detrimental elements. For illustration, there are many health promoting elements contained in toxicodendron radicans, also known as poison ivy. However, as we all know, along with all the good elements, it also contains some rather undesirable elements. (Interestingly, poison ivy is a member of the same family as cashews.)
During my thirty years of logging, charting and experimenting the effects of foods, I find fats to be one of the most socially prominent "magic potion" foods, yet it is also one of the most consequential (I'm not just talking about weight). Fats are the most concentrated of all food groups and all oils are isolated fats - 100% concentration. However, taking 24-48 hours for the threshold of effect, it is outside the human attention span, thus buried in the "noise" of all the other variables. One of the negative effects of all fats is insulin resistance, which slows and restricts all biological functions. It is further not noticed because the effect duration is about 30 days. Adding more fat inside 30 days is additive to the duration. As such, most Americans have never experienced life without insulin resistance. One of the many detrimental effects of insulin resistance is that it shifts the systematic biological timings out of sync, resulting in inappropriate biological functions. Just one of the many results is inflammation.
Due to the popularity of fats; "good fats" are the sought after "magic potion", ignoring that all whole plant foods have more than enough "good" fats - even foods that are considered to be "fat-free". I have found it to be literally impossible to consume a survivable amount of calories and be fat deficient, no matter how obsessively fat-free I try to be.
The perception of health is relative with a variable reference. If you have never experience insulin sensitivity, then you will consider yourself to feel good and healthy, but that is only because you have never experienced better.
Also, in all my years of logging and charting for health as a Type-1 Diabetic, I have found the importance of whole, unprocessed foods. For example; eating a whole, intact apple has a very gentle, almost benign, effect on blood-sugar. Puree the same apple, maintaining all its original elements, and it will result in a considerable blood-sugar spike. Juice the same apple and it will result is a huge blood-sugar spike. The reason is that external processing bypasses important parts of the digestive system, which includes chewing.

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Wow, that is an awesome description of the issues. Thank you Ken! May I quote you on that?

 
This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Hi Deborah,
Yes, you are welcome to quote me. I would be honored.

 
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This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Ken, Your comment is so right on and so great. I wish everybody could read it. I guess they can, if I can just somehow get them all over to this page. :-)
Sean

 
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