Fecal Bacteria Content in Sushi

Fecal Bacteria Content in Sushi

Sushi lovers could be eating more than just raw seafood. Animal products, especially poultry and fish are loaded with fecal bacteria. This poses several potential hazards for consumers, including food poisoning. According to Dr. Michael Greger, the 24 or 48-hour stomach bug isn't actually the "stomach flu" but most likely food poisoning. Researchers found that in a meat-eaters house, there's more fecal bacteria on the kitchen counter top, sponges, dish towels and the sink drain than there is on the toilet. This is one reason why the USDA doesn't recommend washing meat and poultry under running water. The viral and bacterial content splatters - covering the surfaces of the refrigerator, utensils, sink handles, clothing, skin, and counter tops. As these surfaces are touched, bacteria are spread to other areas of the house, and from person to person. "Even after bleaching everything twice" Dr. Greger states, "in a meat eater's house it is safer to lick the rim of the toilet seat than the kitchen counter top." The maximum allowable fecal bacteria on ready-to-eat food items is 30,000. However, when several samples of sushi were tested, the fecal bacteria (E. coli) count was as high as 90,000.

To avoid food poisoning and other toxic contaminates contained in fish, many delicious recipes for meatless sushi can be found on the internet. Click here for a meatless sushi recipe by Forks Over Knives

Michael Greger MD Links

Scroll Down Page to Leave Comments

Starch-Smart Social Networking
Join our Online Support Community at DrCarney.com/club featuring Starch-Smart Discussions, Blogs and more by signing up for a free membership to Dr. Carney's Community.

Starch-Smart HelpfulSharing.SmalBanner

 

 

Rate this blog entry:
NFL Player David Carter Proves Carnivorous Skeptic...
The Scoop on Poop

Related Posts

 

Comments (0)

Rated 0 out of 5 based on 0 votes
There are no comments posted here yet

Leave your comments

Posting comment as a guest. Sign up or login to your account.
Attachments (0 / 3)
Share Your Location