Fat, Not Sugar, Causes Type 2 Diabetes

How Insulin Works Diagram

​Though the media and most health professionals promote the message that high sugar consumption is the cause of type 2 diabetes, this idea is not really true. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease in which the body cells become resistant to insulin, resulting in a rise in blood sugar. High blood sugar is a symptom of diabetes, not the cause of the disease. So what then is the actual cause of type 2 diabetes?

Every time a person eats, his or her blood sugar level rises. An increase in the concentrations of blood glucose stimulates the pancreas to secrete insulin, the hormone responsible for transporting sugar from the bloodstream into the cells. Without insulin, glucose cannot get into the liver, muscle, and fat cells. Insulin signals fat, liver, and muscle cells to absorb glucose from the blood by opening the 'glucose gates' on the cells. Insulin works by binding to insulin receptors located on the surface of these cells and triggering a series of enzymes that activate a set of glucose transporter proteins (GLUT4) which convey glucose from the bloodstream into muscle, liver, and fat cells. Once glucose is transported into the cells, plasma concentrations of glucose return to normal within hours.

What if the insulin signaling process is disrupted and cells can no longer respond to insulin? Disruption of the insulin signaling process will result in a condition called insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a condition where the pancreas secretes insulin, but fat and muscle cells do not respond to it by taking in the glucose. Since the glucose obtained from Insulin Resistance creating diets cannot get into the cells, and they have no where else to go, glucose will remain in the bloodstream, leading to an increase in blood sugar levels. This is what happens in type 2 diabetes. So what disrupts the insulin signaling process and induces insulin resistance? It is dietary fat as well as animal protein. Yes, even if the fat is vegan.

Fatty foods increase the amounts of free fatty acids floating in the bloodstream and inside the muscle cells. Metabolism of fats in muscle cells produce toxic metabolites and free radicals that interrupt the insulin signaling process, induce insulin resistance, and inhibit the uptake of glucose. Fats can stimulate insulin resistance really quickly. In fact, insulin resistance can occur within 3 hours after the consumption of a high-fat meal.

Insulin resistance is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Fat—not sugar—induces insulin resistance, so fat is the real enemy in type 2 diabetes. Understanding this mystery is key to solving the current type 2 diabetes epidemic ravaging the world. A dietary approach that encourages the consumption of diets dominated by whole plant foods and devoid of all animal products and vegetable oils can help prevent, control, and even reverse type 2 diabetes.

Additional Information:

(1) Type 2 Diabetes: The Basics

(2) Pre-Diabetes and Insulin Resistance

(3) Fat is the Cause of Type 2 Diabetes

(4) Beat Type 2 Diabetes With These 3 Foods

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Comments (4)

Rated 5 out of 5 based on 1 votes
  1. Mitchell Castell

I have a question -

I understand everything that is written in the article above, but want to understand why insulin shots are necessary for Type II Diabetics. If the fat in the cells promote insulin resistance, how does an insulin shot or additional insulin help?

Please let me know so I can better understand.

Thank you!

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  1. Ken Thomas

Hi Mitchell,

I'm not a doctor or medical professional in any sense, but thought I would chime in with what I have learned from personal experience and from Dr. Carney and other doctors like her.

Glucose is dissipated by conversion to energy. It is biology's fuel. Anything that prevents glucose from being dissipated into energy (metabolism) causes it to build up in the blood stream. Insulin is the hormone that enables the cells to metabolize glucose. It is the equivalent of fuel injectors in a car engine.

I guess you already know all that, but to answer your question; insulin resistance is an analog effect - not digital. The "resistance" in insulin resistance means that it's function is resisted, but not entirely stopped (stopped would be fatal). When more insulin is required for sufficient metabolism than one's beta cells can produce, then adding more from an external source helps fill the gap. Of course, this should be considered an intermediate treatment while the insulin resistance condition is being reversed. The value of the extra insulin is to keep metabolism at a sufficient rate to sustain the cells. High blood sugar indicates an unsustainable (failing) rate.

Suppl...

Hi Mitchell,

I'm not a doctor or medical professional in any sense, but thought I would chime in with what I have learned from personal experience and from Dr. Carney and other doctors like her.

Glucose is dissipated by conversion to energy. It is biology's fuel. Anything that prevents glucose from being dissipated into energy (metabolism) causes it to build up in the blood stream. Insulin is the hormone that enables the cells to metabolize glucose. It is the equivalent of fuel injectors in a car engine.

I guess you already know all that, but to answer your question; insulin resistance is an analog effect - not digital. The "resistance" in insulin resistance means that it's function is resisted, but not entirely stopped (stopped would be fatal). When more insulin is required for sufficient metabolism than one's beta cells can produce, then adding more from an external source helps fill the gap. Of course, this should be considered an intermediate treatment while the insulin resistance condition is being reversed. The value of the extra insulin is to keep metabolism at a sufficient rate to sustain the cells. High blood sugar indicates an unsustainable (failing) rate.

Supplemental insulin is definitely not a fix - with its own issues - but it helps reduce cell carnage until the insulin resistance is finally eliminated. Fortunately, cutting fat from the diet does the trick (keeping all ingredients below 10% calories from fat). Also note that exercise accelerates the progress by increasing blood flow. Animal protein also causes insulin resistance by a somewhat different process that involves inflammation that damages the cells metabolic elements.

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  1. Sean Carney
  1. 5 / 5

Thank you so much Ken for providing an answer to Mitchell's question. I read the question to Dr. Carney this morning over breakfast. She said "Good Question!" and told me that she will reply when things slow down a bit. But, as you know, things around here can get pretty busy. So, I know she will be grateful for your thoughtful reply. And, I expect we will also hear from her here as well.

Sean

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  1. Mitchell Castell

Thank you Ken for your reply it's always good to learn!

And thank you Sean for reading my question to to Dr. Carney this morning! I hope it made breakfast a little more interesting.

I look forward to Dr. Carney's response as well.

Thanks again as I am a group leader for PlantPure Communities and need to be knowledgeable if questions like this ever come up.

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