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Whole Grains May Protect Against Esophageal Cancer

Healing Whole Grains Bathed In Sunshine Healing Whole Grains Bathed In Sunshine

Esophageal Cancer is one of the most deadly cancers of the digestive tract. In the United States, it accounts for 1% of all cancers diagnosed in this country.The incidence of esophageal cancer has risen by more than 700% in the past four decades, making it the fastest growing cancer in the United States, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Fortunately, a large body of research has shown that avoiding alcohol and nicotine, while eliminating animal protein, as well as consuming whole grains instead of refined grains can (when instituted together) help to prevent the onset of esophageal cancer. One study conducted by a group of researchers from Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and Finland found out that regular intake of unrefined whole grains significantly cut down the risk of esophageal cancer by a whopping 45%. A total of 113,933 persons participated in this study and were observed for their diets and incidence of esophageal cancer. "In this study, whole-grain consumption, particularly whole-grain wheat, was inversely associated with risk of esophageal cancer," concluded the authors. Another study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition show that replacing dairy and other animal product foods with unrefined whole grains can lower the risk of getting esophageal cancer. 

Scientists believe that the protective effect exerted by whole grains on esophageal cancer may be due to their high content of fiber, antioxidants, and anti-inflammatory compounds. Vegetables may have even more of those good phytonutrients than do unrefined whole grains. Obesity, inflammation, oxidative stress, and gastro-esophageal reflux disease have all been implicated in the development of esophageal cancer. The fiber, antioxidants, and anti-inflammatory compounds in whole grains help to regulate weight gain, protect against gastro-esophageal reflux disease, neutralize excess free radicals, and combat chronic inflammation, thereby reducing the likelihood of acquiring esophageal cancer.

According to Cancer Research UK, lifestyle factors, such as obesity, smoking, and alcohol, cause 9 out of 10 esophageal cancers. This implies that esophageal cancer is primarily a lifestyle disease and as such, is actually preventable. Daily consumption of 3 servings of whole grains, if they are ingested instead of meat, eggs, or cheese, has been associated with significant reduction in the risk of several chronic diseases, including esophageal cancer. Choosing unrefined whole grains instead of eating refined grains made into flour may improve our chances of avoiding this fatal cancer that takes more than 15,000 American lives every year.

Additional Information:

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Comments (3)

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Is Ezekiel bread safe to eat regarding this article?

  Steve
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Steve,

This website does not establish a physician/patient relationship. That relationship is necessary in order to provide the correct answer to the type of question you asked.

This comment section cannot answer personal medical questions like this, but you may purchase a food coaching consult at Veggievore.com for $149 so that information may be obtained that can help you to find the answer that is right for you.
https://www.veggievore.com/advice/one-hour-custom-coaching-consultation

  Linda Carney MD
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Hello Steve,
Thank you for posting a question here. I see that Dr. Carney already replied to you. I wanted to pipe in my two cents worth. About 30 years ago I had a vegetarian restaurant in Los Angeles, first in a space donated to us by the Food For Life Bakery (They produce the Ezekiel 4:9 bread) and then later in the downtown high-rise district. We always served their breads exclusively in our vegan restaurants. During that time I was in and out of the Food For Life Bakery often and was able to see the process they use. It is impressive. They ran a super clean facility and produced wonderful sprouted grain products. I love their company. And, I love their bread. It is super high quality. And, in my mind it is excellent food, provided you are not allergic to any of the ingredients. Unfortunately there are some people who can't eat certain whole grains for a variety of reasons, sometimes the sprouted grains are OK and sometimes that still does not solve health issues of certain individuals. So, that is why Dr. Carney is not able to give you a simple yes or no answer to your question. But, her advice is right on. You should consider consulting with a Physician knowledgeable in...

Hello Steve,
Thank you for posting a question here. I see that Dr. Carney already replied to you. I wanted to pipe in my two cents worth. About 30 years ago I had a vegetarian restaurant in Los Angeles, first in a space donated to us by the Food For Life Bakery (They produce the Ezekiel 4:9 bread) and then later in the downtown high-rise district. We always served their breads exclusively in our vegan restaurants. During that time I was in and out of the Food For Life Bakery often and was able to see the process they use. It is impressive. They ran a super clean facility and produced wonderful sprouted grain products. I love their company. And, I love their bread. It is super high quality. And, in my mind it is excellent food, provided you are not allergic to any of the ingredients. Unfortunately there are some people who can't eat certain whole grains for a variety of reasons, sometimes the sprouted grains are OK and sometimes that still does not solve health issues of certain individuals. So, that is why Dr. Carney is not able to give you a simple yes or no answer to your question. But, her advice is right on. You should consider consulting with a Physician knowledgeable in Food as Medicine and using a Whole-food, Plant-based, No-oil lifestyle to prevent and reverse disease.
I see you have come here and posted your comment as a guest. I would like to invite you to sign up for a free membership here to become acquainted with the many members who also might be able to be of help to you.
You can sign up for the free membership at https://www.drcarney.com/community
We look forward to getting to know you more,
Sean

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  Sean Carney
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