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  • I'm glad you are going to give it a go Karen! Eliminating oil, excess salt & refined carbs like sugar & alcohol from the plant-based diet is a HUGELY important step. Eliminating wheat, citrus, chocolate etc may also make a big difference. Personally, I have to avoid gluten & corn to keep my...

    I'm glad you are going to give it a go Karen! Eliminating oil, excess salt & refined carbs like sugar & alcohol from the plant-based diet is a HUGELY important step. Eliminating wheat, citrus, chocolate etc may also make a big difference. Personally, I have to avoid gluten & corn to keep my joints happy.

    I'm glad the Elimination Diet Dr. McDougall provides is free. :-)

    I had such bad pain in my hip joints by the time I was 30, I could barely walk up a short flight of stairs. I noticed an improvement in my overall well being almost immediately after removing the potential food triggers from my diet. Two weeks after eliminating my food triggers, I noticed a big improvement in how my joints felt. By 6 weeks, I was running up the stairs!

    I never had it formally labelled by a clinician because what mattered to me was eliminating the pain. I figured that if the pain was eliminated, that probably meant the inflammation causing the damage was gone and that healing could then occur, to whatever degree was possible. I resumed an active life, running around after kids, dancing, hiking, biking, etc.

    That was over 30 years ago for me and my hips are still completely functional & comfortable, which at my age, is rare. In my opinion, if "wear-and-tear" were the primary cause, I would be a prime candidate for it. I walk as much as 5 miles EVERY day, sometimes more. I care for a large garden & orchard, take fitness classes or roller skate, etc. In my opinion, the medical system is guessing that wear-and-tear is the cause, because they have not looked at the impact of diet.

    Here is another study indicating that selective, low-fat (oil-free) whole foods vegan diet may help osteoarthritis.
    https://www.hindawi.com/journals/arthritis/2015/708152/

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  • Deborah liked a comment in Callie's Cancer Part 3
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  • Ruhl, would you provide a link to some peer-reviewed research to back-up your statement please? :-)

    Please forgive me if my request seems picky or fussy. It's just that sometimes claims are sometimes based more on preference or belief than facts. We need to be careful about what to accept! ...

    Ruhl, would you provide a link to some peer-reviewed research to back-up your statement please? :-)

    Please forgive me if my request seems picky or fussy. It's just that sometimes claims are sometimes based more on preference or belief than facts. We need to be careful about what to accept! I hope you understand. :-)

    We can certainly agree that eating a few whole walnuts in a day may be beneficial in some ways, especially if eating the walnuts helps a person avoid eating animal products or junk food. However, the oil may be less beneficial since it is too easy to over-consume it and it has had many of the beneficial elements of whole nuts removed such as the fiber, protein & minerals.

    Here is an example of a report based on peer-reviewed research. I hope you find this of interest. :-)
    https://nutritionfacts.org/video/extra-virgin-olive-oil-vs-nuts/

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  • Hi Michelle. 

    In response to your question about what foods do I normally buy:

    I like to stick to the four plant-based food groups: fruits, vegetables, whole grains & legumes (beans, peas & lentils).

    I rarely use a recipe anymore because I...

    Hi Michelle. 

    In response to your question about what foods do I normally buy:

    I like to stick to the four plant-based food groups: fruits, vegetables, whole grains & legumes (beans, peas & lentils).

    I rarely use a recipe anymore because I usually just chop up some vegetables into a pot with some whole grain (like brown rice), cook them in just enough water to do the amount of grain until they are soft with some herbs and/or spices that I like.  Cooking the veggies in with the whole grain makes a quick, easy meal.

    If I haven't had any beans yet that day, just before serving, I add some cooked beans, peas or lentils that I have cooked in large batches separarely and keep frozen in convenient quantities.  The result is what we call a "stoop": a soup that is as thick as a stew!  LOL

    I have some fruit while I'm making the meal usually, so that way I get all 4 food groups in a meal.  :-)

    It's super simple and every meal is an adventure.  They always taste good because the food itself tastes good.  

    I use recipes when we have company or a special occasiona but mostly, just "winging it" works.  I know you said you need recipes.  I wondering if maybe you try just cooking-by-chance a bit, you may discover that you have a hidden talent.  :-)

    In case you would like to try some recipes too, here are a nice bunch. 

    https://beansriceeverythingnice.weebly.com/recipe-index.html

    Happy plant-based eating!  

     

     

     

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  • Deborah unlocked the badge Points Achiever
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  • Deborah added a new comment in Cancer Simplified

    I'm so glad you are part of this community Ken. I really appreciate your contributions.

    Regarding feeding a carnivore an herbaceous diet: I have read considerable research and encountered many additional case reports indicating that dogs can be fed a suitably-formulated plant-based diet &...

    I'm so glad you are part of this community Ken. I really appreciate your contributions.

    Regarding feeding a carnivore an herbaceous diet: I have read considerable research and encountered many additional case reports indicating that dogs can be fed a suitably-formulated plant-based diet & thrive. Our Bart lived twice as long as the usual life-expectancy for dogs his size. I also understand that there is similar evidence & experience with cats.

    In reading more about this recently, one authority suggested that ... in general... any animal can be safely fed LOWER on the food chain (assuming all nutrients needs are met) than the reverse.

    If that is true therefore, we can expect carnivores to live longer & healthier when eating a suitably-formulated plant-based diet than when they eat their more natural diet; and herbivores to live shorter, sicker lives when eating higher on the food chain.

    We've seen this to be true of dogs & cats; and also with humans. Being physiological herbivores, we CAN eat higher on the food chain (such as in modern society, northern Inuit & African Masai) but the consequences are shortened life-span and inferior health.

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  • Deborah added a new comment in Cancer Simplified

    I'm so glad you are part of this community Ken. I really appreciate your contributions.

    Regarding feeding a carnivore an herbaceous diet: I have read considerable research and encountered many additional case reports indicating that dogs can be fed a suitably-formulated plant-based diet &...

    I'm so glad you are part of this community Ken. I really appreciate your contributions.

    Regarding feeding a carnivore an herbaceous diet: I have read considerable research and encountered many additional case reports indicating that dogs can be fed a suitably-formulated plant-based diet & thrive. Our Bart lived twice as long as the usual life-expectancy for dogs his size. I also understand that there is similar evidence & experience with cats.

    In reading more about this recently, one authority suggested that ... in general... any animal can be safely fed LOWER on the food chain (assuming all nutrients needs are met) than the reverse.

    If that is true therefore, we can expect carnivores to live longer & healthier when eating a suitably-formulated plant-based diet than when they eat their more natural diet; and herbivores to live shorter, sicker lives when eating higher on the food chain.

    We've seen this to be true of dogs & cats; and also with humans. Being physiological herbivores, we CAN eat higher on the food chain (such as in modern society, northern Inuit & African Masai) but the consequences are shortened life-span and inferior health.

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  •   scarney commented on this post about 10 months ago

    Hi Goldie;

    Until Dr. Carney has the chance to respond, here are some more of her articles that may help you answer your questions.

    https://www.drcarney.com/blog/health-issues/getting-milked-out-of-money-and-health

    https://www.drcarney.com/blog/condition-related/dairy-elevates-ovarian-cancer-r...

    Hi Goldie;

    Until Dr. Carney has the chance to respond, here are some more of her articles that may help you answer your questions.

    https://www.drcarney.com/blog/health-issues/getting-milked-out-of-money-and-health

    https://www.drcarney.com/blog/condition-related/dairy-elevates-ovarian-cancer-risk

    https://www.drcarney.com/activities/public-speaking/womens-health

    Personally, I follow Dr. Carney's advice to avoid all animal products and eat a diet of whole plant foods. Wishing you all the best...

    Deborah

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  • Here are a bunch more peer-reviewed papers on the specific issue of diverticulitis & diet, pointing at whole foods plant-based diet in general as significantly helpful. https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/diverticulitis/

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  • Red meat is only part of the issue. There is also a substantial amount of info pointing at a whole foods plant-based diet from many angles being healthiest for our intestinal health. :-) https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/microbiome/

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  • Deborah likes a discussion post
    Fat Deficient?

    In recent conversations regarding dietary fat and the pursuit of "good fats", I often mention that it is virtually impossible to be fat deficient - regardless how fat-free one tries to be (unless starving). I mention that every whole food has...

    In recent conversations regarding dietary fat and the pursuit of "good fats", I often mention that it is virtually impossible to be fat deficient - regardless how fat-free one tries to be (unless starving). I mention that every whole food has more than enough fat - even lettuce which has 8% fat and celery has 9%. Almost no one can believe this, and explains that when they look at nutrition labels for leafy greens, such as spinach, lettuce, etc. the fat content is always ZERO.

    I would like to explain this discrepancy. It is due to the listed serving size. The total calories in many of these foods are so low that 8% of those calories are below the legal notation requirement, so it gets a zero.

    To really determine the percentage of fat, go to the SELFNutritionData website and enter the food of interest. Here is a link to lettuce: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2477/2. Scroll down to the Serving size pull-down box and select 100 grams. Then scroll down past the Nutrition Data box, down to the Calorie Information box. Calories are the real common dominator because grams measure mass, not the effect magnitude of an item. Note the total calories is 15 and fat calories is 1.3. From that, 1.3/15=8.6%.

    Of course you can't stuff yourself with enough lettuce to get your daily calorie needs, but the point is that everyone knows that lettuce is a very low fat food, but it is still 8% fat (humans only need 6%). That means that eating any variety of whole plant based foods, even the lowest imaginable fat foods, still supplies more than enough fats. (In my personal experience, anything over 10% is too much.)

    Still on the lettuce page, scroll down to the Fats & Fatty Acids box. There you will see that Omega-3 fatty acids are double the Omega-6 fatty acids. I find this to be true of most foods that are considered "fat-free", so, trying to be "fat-free" actually helps to ensure I get the desired Omega fats ratio.

    Thanks for listening!

    Ken

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