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  • kenscircus replied to a discussion, T1 Diabetic
    Hi Karen,

    So sorry for the delay. My computer access time has been reduced to a few minutes every few days.

    Answers to your questions:
    CGM? I just use a cheapie glucometer. Never tried a CGM. It might be good, but I never felt that my...
    Hi Karen,

    So sorry for the delay. My computer access time has been reduced to a few minutes every few days.

    Answers to your questions:
    CGM? I just use a cheapie glucometer. Never tried a CGM. It might be good, but I never felt that my cheapie glucometer was inconvenient. Also, I don't like having devices on me. I don't even wear a wristwatch.

    Pens? I use syringes and vials. I find keeping things simple and basic gives me the most personal control.

    The question about 20 minutes before insulin and different foods are part of the core of the SPP method. Timing is a major part of SPP however, the timing is not a fixed figure. It is derived from the log and varies. It may be 20 minutes, 10 minutes, 5 minutes or even 30 minutes.

    The log I started out with was an 8-1/2 X 11-inch spiral bound notebook. The format and content evolved over the years. The important thing to realize is that every individual is different. So much so that there is no one size fit's all. There are so many variables that metabolic balance is different per individual (even identical twins) and everything changes for each individual throughout one's life. There is no standard, at least for control to non-diabetic levels. Changes occur daily, weekly, yearly, etc. To maintain non-diabetic blood sugars, all of the parameters must be tracked continuously. It is never static. The purpose of the log is for pattern tracking which determines the insulin dose and timing, food type, quantity and timing. While it is a detailed control method, you don't have to worry about any math or complicated science. There is no carb or calorie counting or carbs per insulin, etc. It's all about pattern tracking. Although, when I first started, I logged the ounces (weight) of everything for reference. Eventually, I stopped logging the weight once I learned to "eyeball it".

    Logging is a matter of recording all the food eaten throughout the day and night along with the time and quantity of each item eaten - even a nibble. Glucometer testing is logged with time. I often double test, 15 - 30 minutes apart to determine if blood-sugar is rising or falling and at what rate. I typically test about 12 times per day. Insulin doses are logged with the insulin type, time and dose units. The point is to track the patterns, learn what affects what, in what way and in what time frame and learn how to make adjustments and fine tune to continuous non-diabetic levels.

    As a buffer, I tend to take a few extra units of insulin beyond what should perfectly cancel a rise to 85 mg/dl. With that, I know that I will be going low. Double testing lets me know the downward rate (units per time) so I can estimate when I will cross the 70 mg/dl line and preempt it with a fruit snack pulling back up to 85 mg/dl (before actually reaching 70 mg/dl). The fruit snack is chosen by its rise rate and duration, which is derived from the log. It is the strategic snacks that are used for fine tuning. The fruit or any foods response characteristics in one's system changes with all of life's variables, so log tracking is necessary to make accurate in-the-moment predictions. I also keep a snack bag of medjool dates in my pocket at all times, in case I get distracted and miss a scheduled snack.

    Fruits are the typical choice for adjustment snacks because their blood-sugar effect has a fast ramp rate with a short effect duration. This combination reduces the hazard of overcompensating. It is indeed possible to overcompensate with fruit, but the consequence is short lived.

    Starting out may be quite shaky and make you think it is all going crazy, but as you start learning the patterns of the foods, activities and insulins it will all start to sync up. One thing to keep in mind is that it is very hard, if not impossible to synchronize your system if insulin resistant. As mentioned earlier, insulin resistance is increased with any fat intake that is 10% (or greater) of total calories. For me, and it appears typical of others, a greater than 10% intake in one meal will increase blood-sugar baseline about 48 hours later. Prior to that is appears benign. After that the effect lasts about 30 days - and it is additive. That is why it is generally not noticed. The greatest detriment is that it slows insulin action and lengthens blood-sugar spike durations of foods that should be short. A killer of keeping everything in sync. What this means is that if you have been on a low-carb diet with any food greater than 10% calories from fat, it will take quite a while before you can get things in sync. It took me almost a year.

    In closing, I would like to point out that in the past, I have not been successful in portraying the SPP concept to a fully functional degree to anyone via Q&A on any forum. I believe this is due to it being so different from conventional methods that everyone is used to and tries to add the SPP method to what they are already used to. While it has been helpful to many, none have understood the concept sufficient to achieve continuous non-diabetic levels. That is why I decided to put it all in a book. Although I don't feel the SPP concept is complicated, it just takes more than Q&A to fully communicate the concept. As stated earlier, I don't mind Q&A and I hope it will be helpful, I just hope the book will actually help its readers become non-diabetic diabetics.

    Also, if you want faster help, you could get coaching from Cyrus and Robby at: http://www.masteringdiabetes.org. They do not use the SPP method, but they can certainly help. I don't think it is free, but it is probably worth the cost.
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  • kenscircus unlocked the badge Sherlock Holmes
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  • kenscircus replied to a discussion, T1 Diabetic
    Hi Karen and a big welcome to DrCarney.com!

    Yes, I was on the McDougall forum a while back, but tapered off due to time constraints. I then found Dr. Carney and moved to DrCarney.com, especially since she became my primary care physician....
    Hi Karen and a big welcome to DrCarney.com!

    Yes, I was on the McDougall forum a while back, but tapered off due to time constraints. I then found Dr. Carney and moved to DrCarney.com, especially since she became my primary care physician. Also, I do not agree with Dr. McDougall regarding type-1 diabetes management.

    As far as a good doctor who agrees with a starch-based diet, I would recommend Dr. Carney. True, she is not local to you, but she is worth the travel. I see it as a value thing. I think one's health is worth the travel. By the way, she does have patients in the Dallas area (and some even farther) that travels to see her.

    As far as a good doctor to control you blood-sugar's, I do not believe any doctor can do that regardless of their knowledge or skill, or at least to the level that I believe in. I believe that T1D control is personal - more personal than can be controlled by any doctor's orders. It would be like another person telling you how to walk a tight rope. Regardless how skilled the person, real-time commands just cannot keep you balanced on that rope. Only you can do that.

    I call my method the SPP method or Synchronous Push-Pull method. Synchronous means the insulin, food and metabolic system is in sync. Push-Pull means that blood-sugar control is exerted on both ends; Pushed down and Pulled up. Nothing is left to "free-run" or "hope for the best."

    The SPP method is a control method that I developed out of fear of diabetic complications (I did and do not want to be diabetic). The method maintains blood-sugar between 70 mg/dl to 100 mg/dl at ALL times. The SPP method is not yet published, but I am currently working on finishing a book - I'm still suffering from time constraints. Once finished, I intend to publish it as a PDF format for free distribution. In the meantime I will try to answer any questions here. The book title is: Synchronous Push-Pull Type-1 Diabetes Control: The Non-Diabetic Diabetic Method.

    The primary benefit to a low-fat plant-based high glycemic diet for T1D is the predictable, syncable blood-sugar spikes. The predictability of the spike levels and duration makes it conducive to matching the insulin dose and timing. It also means that a continuous insulin supply is not necessary, thus a pump is not necessary. Instead of pumps and doctor prescribed management, the SPP methods primary control element is a detailed running log of foods, activity, insulin and blood-sugars. The log is a requirement because I can't imagine anyone who could remember all the details over the days and weeks needed for tracking to manage the control. Low-Fat (10% or less calories from fat) is also required because fat increases insulin resistance. Insulin resistance raises the blood-sugar baseline and slides control out of sync.

    Here is an excerpt from my book to help give an idea of the method:

    The best way to avoid diabetic complications is to not be diabetic. The condition of diabetes is defined as chronic high blood-sugar or hyperglycemia. The purpose of the Synchronous Push-Pull method is to control blood-sugar to non-diabetic normal levels, specifically to maintain blood-sugars between 70 to 100 mg/dl at all times - non-diabetic normal. This level of control makes a Type-1 diabetic a non-diabetic diabetic.

    How is the SPP method different from traditional T1D control methods?
    * The SPP method is log driven, pattern tracking.
    * The SPP controls both rising and falling blood-sugar (Push-Pull) - eliminating concerns about hypoglycemia (low blood-sugar).
    * The SPP control is predictive and preemptive instead of corrective (Synchronous with your biology - your life).
    * Mealtime insulin dose is set for the absolute blood-sugar peak instead of any predetermined post prandial time. The insulin dose injection timing is aligned to match the insulin action peak with the food blood-sugar peak to cancel out at 85 mg/dl. Yes, this results in a post prandial blood-sugar dip (hypoglycemia), which is preempted by strategic snacks.
    * Strategic snack food time and dose is derived from the log to synchronously fill blood-sugar dips.

    Yes, the SPP method means you are eating something almost all day, about every 1.5 to 2 hours or more - but, I kinda like that! :D
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  • D Robert White:  Thank you for pointing out I made a typo. I have just corrected it. Yes my hubbie is an ex-smoker and that prompted this question. 

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  • Sure Sean, when you both have time, take a look at Dr. William's comments though I pretty much paraphrased them in my post.  And yes, while doing the B12 blood test gives us a level of whether we're in the appropriate range or not, I can't figure...

    Sure Sean, when you both have time, take a look at Dr. William's comments though I pretty much paraphrased them in my post.  And yes, while doing the B12 blood test gives us a level of whether we're in the appropriate range or not, I can't figure out how to assess Dr. William's advice for a daily average of 55 mg to what the blood test level shows and how to subsquently dose the supplement correctly. 

    I didn't remember you lived here earlier in your life. I was here for freshman year of college, 1970-71.  -Denise

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  • I was listening to a great interview the other day and I heard something that was new information and contradicted what I had always heard about vitamin B12....

    In a great interview video where Dr. McDougall interviews Dr. Kim Williams, I heard...

    I was listening to a great interview the other day and I heard something that was new information and contradicted what I had always heard about vitamin B12....

    In a great interview video where Dr. McDougall interviews Dr. Kim Williams, I heard something new about vitamin B12 that surprised me. Dr. Williams said that there is a subgroup of people who need to limit their B12. What a surprise to me as I've heard that having too much B12 is not an issue for folks. So who is this sub-group? Men, over the age of 60, who are ex-smokers. Well that includes my hubbie, Georgie, and who knows how many others.... Dr. Williams said this group of people MUST keep their average daily B12 levels under 55 micrograms a day. This comment appears in the interview at 25:17 (for anyone who would like to watch). So hearing this, my questions become how does one really figure this out to ensure one's level is under 55 mg a day? And knowing this what does it mean for the B12 blood level and how does one ensure there is not too much B12 being stored in the bodies of this sub-group? Dr. Williams suggests one can take a B12 tablet and cut it up to smaller amounts to take but I don't understand how we actually figure out the best way to figure this out and do it correctly. Could you help any of us who need to do this to determine the best way to get it right? Thanking you in advance if you can help....

    Here's the link to the interview and these comments take place at 25:17 into the interview.  

    https://www.drmcdougall.com/health/education/webinars/webinar-05-02-19/?fbclid=IwAR3w2UmieiDVYpstoi4K5QA7Y54RLYKdl6BcHwZXQEehdjGPQ0pYVq0AjNA

     

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  • Sean,  Yes, I think you've highlighted the most important take-away from this issue.  Countries consuming the most milk, have the most fractures.  Unfortunately, the old theory of leeching calcium from the bones is still mentioned by some...

    Sean,  Yes, I think you've highlighted the most important take-away from this issue.  Countries consuming the most milk, have the most fractures.  Unfortunately, the old theory of leeching calcium from the bones is still mentioned by some doctors. Hopefully, they will learn that theory has been debunked so they stop talking about it.  Now I am going to post another perplexing issue, one I just learned about from Dr. Kim Williams. Perhaps after the downsizing, when you can breathe again, you and Dr. Carney might help figure this one out. 

    In the meantime, best wishes for the changes in your medical practice and office. And remember, when you need a break, the Happy Vegan Couple has an open invititation for your visit! 

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  • I posted the above comment a month ago and see there have been no responses. Today I found the answer to my question. It is all explained in this video by Dr. Greger. Unfortunately, some of our plant-based docs have old content on the internet...

    I posted the above comment a month ago and see there have been no responses. Today I found the answer to my question. It is all explained in this video by Dr. Greger. Unfortunately, some of our plant-based docs have old content on the internet that has the old theory and not the subsequent research. Here's the answer. Calcium is NOT leeched from the bones due to a high acid load from animal protein. And the video explains why: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/alkaline-diets-animal-protein-and-calcium-loss/

    PS: To understand then why countries drinking the most milk have the most fractures, the current theory is the milk sugar, galactose is responsible for the bone loss. Galactose also has other serious effects including early mortality and cancer.

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