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Cardiovascular Health Benefits of Specific Vegetable Types: A Narrative Review.

Consistent consumption of certain vegetables, such as cruciferous, allium, leafy green, and yellow-orange red vegetables plus legumes may have a positive impact on cardiovascular health.

​This study examined the effect of frequent intake of some specific vegetables on cardiovascular health. Researchers evaluated data and evidence extracted from relevant studies. 

Researchers noticed that regular consumers of certain vegetables, such as cruciferous, allium, leafy green, and yellow-orange red vegetables plus legumes had healthy cardiovascular profile. This study pointed out the beneficial effects of consuming vegetables on cardiovascular health.

Research Summary Information

  • 2018
  • Blekkenhorst LC, Sim M, Bondonno CP, Bondonno NP, Ward NC, Prince RL, Devine A, Lewis JR, Hodgson JM.
  • School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. l.blekkenhorst@ecu.edu.au. Medical School, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. l.blekkenhorst@ecu.edu.au. School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. marc.sim@ecu.edu.au. School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. c.bondonno@ecu.edu.au. School of Biomedical Sciences, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. c.bondonno@ecu.edu.au. School of Biomedical Sciences, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. nicola.bondonno@uwa.edu.au. 7 Medical School, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. natalie.ward@curtin.edu.au. School of Public Health & Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia. natalie.ward@curtin.edu.au. Medical School, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre Unit, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia. richard.prince@uwa.edu.au. Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia. richard.prince@uwa.edu.au. School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. a.devine@ecu.edu.au. School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. joshua.lewis@ecu.edu.au. Medical School, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. joshua.lewis@ecu.edu.au. Centre for Kidney Research, Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia. joshua.lewis@ecu.edu.au. School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. joshua.lewis@ecu.edu.au. School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. jonathan.hodgson@ecu.edu.au. Medical School, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6000, Australia. jonathan.hodgson@ecu.edu.au.
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
Greater vegetable variety and amount are associate...

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