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Soft drink consumption and gestational diabetes risk in the SUN project.

Gestational diabetes is more likely to occur in women who are habitual consumers of sugar-sweetened beverages.

​This study assessed the impact of high intake of soft drinks on the risk of gestational diabetes. More than 3,300 women who had at least one pregnancy over a 10-year period participated in this study. They were assessed for their soft drink consumption rate and incidence of gestational diabetes. 

Researchers noted that women who drank generous amounts of sugar-sweetened beverages were more likely to be diagnosed with gestational diabetes than their counterparts who avoided from these drinks. However, diet soft drink was found to have no influence on the risk of gestation diabetes in this study. This research work provides evidence that avid consumption of sweetened beverages may put a woman at high risk of developing gestational diabetes.

Research Summary Information

  • 2018
  • Donazar-Ezcurra M, Lopez-Del Burgo C, Martinez-Gonzalez MA, Basterra-Gortari FJ, de Irala J, Bes-Rastrollo M.
  • Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; CIBER Fisiopatologia de la Obesidad y Nutricion (CIBERobn), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Navarra's Health Research Institute (IDISNA), Pamplona, Spain; Institute for Culture and Society (ICS), University of Navarra, Spain. Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; CIBER Fisiopatologia de la Obesidad y Nutricion (CIBERobn), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Navarra's Health Research Institute (IDISNA), Pamplona, Spain. Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; Navarra's Health Research Institute (IDISNA), Pamplona, Spain; Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology), Hospital Reina Sofia, Osasunbidea-IDISNA, Tudela, Spain. Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; CIBER Fisiopatologia de la Obesidad y Nutricion (CIBERobn), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Navarra's Health Research Institute (IDISNA), Pamplona, Spain. Electronic address: mbes@unav.es.
  • No, Free full text of study was not found.
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