1 minute reading time (152 words)

Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and incident hypertension: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohorts.


​Generous consumers of sugar-sweetened beverages may have a higher tendency of developing hypertension than rare- and non-consumers of these types of beverages.

This meta-analysis investigated the association between frequent consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and the risk of developing hypertension. A team of scientists from Canada analyzed data and evidence extracted from 6 prospective cohort studies that examined more than 200,000 subjects and 79,000 cases of hypertension.

The team of investigators observed that individuals who consistently consumed more than one servings of sugary beverages per day had a 12% higher risk of suffering from hypertension than individuals with low intake of sugar-sweetened beverages or non-consumers these types of beverages. According to this study, consumption of an extra serving of sugared beverage per day was found to increase the risk of developing hypertension by 8.2%. The findings of this meta-analysis indicate that frequent consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages may increase the vulnerability of an individual to hypertension.

Research Summary Information

  • 2015
  • Jayalath VH, de Souza RJ, Ha V, Mirrahimi A, Blanco-Mejia S, Di Buono M, Jenkins AL, Leiter LA, Wolever TM, Beyene J, Kendall CW, Jenkins DJ, Sievenpiper JL.
  • Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis & Clinical Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center, Departments of Nutritional Sciences and. Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis & Clinical Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center, Departments of Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics and. Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, Toronto, Canada; and American Heart Association, Dallas, TX. Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis & Clinical Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center. Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis & Clinical Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, and Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada; Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada; Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis & Clinical Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center, Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis & Clinical Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, and Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada; Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada; john.sievenpiper@utoronto.ca.
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
  • No. Source of funding disclosure not found
  • No. Potential conflicts disclosure not found
Fruit and Vegetables Consumption and Risk of Hyper...
Sugar and artificially sweetened soda consumption ...

Related Posts

 

Comments (0)

Rated 0 out of 5 based on 0 voters
There are no comments posted here yet

Leave your comments

  1. Posting comment as a guest. Sign up or login to your account.
Rate this post:
Attachments (0 / 3)
Share Your Location