Prostate Cancer Linked to Western Diet

Prostate Cancer Sign in Doctors Hands

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in US men. 1 out of every 7 American men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point in their lifetime, and 1 in 39 American men will die from prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in American men. An estimated 26,730 men are expected to die from prostate cancer in 2017, according to the American Cancer Society. So what is causing the huge surge in prostate cancer in American men? Would you be surprised if I suggested that the answer could be found in our diets?

Cancer of the prostate is strongly linked to what men eat. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), countries where people are consuming more westernized highly caloric diets with refined foods and animal proteins are also experiencing rising disease rates, including prostate cancer. The conventional western diet is rich in animal-based products and processed foods, such as refined grains, red meat, processed meat products, high-fat dairy products, butter, eggs, and sugary beverages.

Several studies have found a link between increased consumption of meat, egg, cheese, milk, cream, butter, butter, and fatty foods and elevated risk of prostate cancer. The findings of a study published in the October, 2016 edition of Nutrients showed that men on western diets were more likely to develop prostate cancer than those who regularly consumed a higher percentage of fiber-rich whole plant foods. Another study conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health found out that prostate cancer patients who primarily ate a western diet (full of red meat, high-fat dairy products, and processed foods) had two-and-a-half higher risk of dying from prostate cancer than men whose diets are filled with healthier foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes.

Prostate Cancer Promoting-Action of Western Diets

The conventional western diet is filled with refined foods and animal products, such as meat, egg, and dairy foods. Regular consumption of these products tends to increase plasma levels of testosterone. Testosterone is needed for the normal growth of the prostate gland. However, excess testosterone in the blood may accelerate the growth and development of cancerous cells in the prostate gland, thus increasing an individual's chances of developing prostate cancer.

Prevent Prostate Cancer by Eating Healthy Foods

About 161,360 US men are expected to be diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2017. Most of these cases of prostate cancer can be prevented through lifestyle and dietary modifications. Eating a diet filled with whole, plant-based low-fat foods will help to cut down your chances of developing prostate cancer. Fill your plates with low-fat, oil-free whole plant foods, such as legumes, whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Your prostate gland will thank you for making these healthier food choices.

Additional Information:

(1) Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer

(2) A Western Dietary Pattern Increases Prostate Cancer Risk

(3) Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine: Prostate Cancer

(4) High Testosterone Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk

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