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Prospective association of sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverage intake with risk of hypertension.

Consistent consumption of sugar-sweetened and artificial-sweetened beverages may increase an individual's susceptibility to hypertension.

This study assessed the intake of sugar-sweetened and artificial-sweetened beverages in relation to hypertension risk. Researchers systematically reviewed data and evidence extracted from 6 studies that examined 246,822 subjects and 80,628 cases of hypertension.

The research team found out that regular consumers of sugar-sweetened and artificial-sweetened beverages were at increased risk of developing hypertension. The consumption of an extra serving of sugar-sweetened beverage per day was found to increase an individual's chances of suffering from hypertension by 8%. The results of this study indicate that high consumers of sugar-sweetened and artificial-sweetened beverages may be more prone to develop hypertension.

Research Summary Information

  • 2016
  • Kim Y, Je Y.
  • Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, 130-701 Seoul, South Korea. Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, 130-701 Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: youjinje@khu.ac.kr.
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
  • No. Source of funding disclosure not found
  • No. Potential conflicts disclosure not found
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I find reading these studies interesting. Thanks for posting links to the full text. I was thinking that:
a) people who drink sugar sweetened beverages would tend to have a higher BMI
b) people who drink artificially sweetened beverages are doing so because they need to lose weight

So I was thinking that consumers of both would generally be more likely to have hypertension. However, the studies did try to adjust for BMI and still found a correlation. Just another reason to not be drinking either of these kind of beverages.

 
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You can certainly say that again. It seems that the artificially sweetened beverages still play a little trick with the brain that causes people to over eat.

 
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