Is higher serum cholesterol associated with altered tendon structure or tendon pain? A systematic review.

High plasma cholesterol levels are associated with the presence of tendon pain and the development of abnormal tendon structure.

This study examined the relationship between blood cholesterol levels and tendon health. Researchers conducted a meta-analysis on 17 studies involving 2612 participants. They discovered that patients with tendon abnormalities or pain had reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) but elevated triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) levels in their blood. The result of this analysis shows that high serum concentrations of total cholesterol are associated with increased risk of tendon abnormalities or pain.

Research Summary Information

  • 2015
  • Tilley BJ, Cook JL, Docking SI, Gaida JE.
  • Department of Physiotherapy, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Department of Physiotherapy, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Australian Centre of Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention (ACRISP), Federation University, Victoria, Australia. Department of Physiotherapy, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Discipline of Physiotherapy, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia University of Canberra, Research Institute for Sport and Exercise (UCRISE) Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia.
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
  • Source of funding disclosure found
  • University of Canberra, Research Institute for Sport and Exercise (UC-RISE); University of Canberra, Faculty of Health; Monash University, Department of Physiotherapy.
  • No potential conflicts disclosure found
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