Fiber Intake and Survival After Colorectal Cancer Diagnosis.

​Colorectal cancer patients on high-fiber diets may have a low tendency of dying from the disease.

The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between the consumption of high-fiber foods and the risk of dying from colorectal cancer. A team of researchers analyzed the diets of 1,575 colorectal cancer patient recruited from the Harvard Nurses's Health Study and Health Professional Follow-Up study for 8 years. The colorectal cancer mortality risk of each of the participant in this study was also determined.

The research team discovered that high intake of foods rich in fiber diminished the likelihood of dying from colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer mortality risk was found to decrease by 25% for every 5 gram of fiber added to the diet, with cereal fiber having the greatest mortality risk-reducing effect. The results of this study suggest that regular consumption of foods containing high amounts of fiber may help reduce the rates of deaths from colorectal cancer.

Research Summary Information

  • 2017
  • Song M, Wu K, Meyerhardt JA, Ogino S, Wang M, Fuchs CS, Giovannucci EL, Chan AT.
  • Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston. Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Division of MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut. Department of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. Department of Medical Oncology, Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
  • No, Free full text of study was not found.
  • No source of funding disclosure found
  • No potential conflicts disclosure found
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