Dietary patterns and risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus in U.S. men.

High intakes of fish, poultry, fruits, vegetables, and whole grains may decrease type 2 diabetes mellitus development risk in U.S males.

This study evaluated the role of diets in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Using validated food frequency questionnaires, researchers analyzed the dietary patterns of 42,504 U.S male health professionals between the ages of 40-75 years for 12 years.

The western (involving high intakes of desserts, sweets, French fries, refined grains, red meat, processed meat, and high-fat dairy products) and prudent (involving the consumption of large quantities of fish, poultry, fruits, vegetables, and whole grains) dietary patterns were identified among U.S male medical professionals. The type 2 diabetes mellitus hazard ratio was measured in all the subjects.

Researchers observed that the prudent dietary pattern lowered the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus. On the other hand, high type 2 diabetes risk was found in subjects who followed the western dietary pattern. The results of this study show that high consumption of desserts, sweets, French fries, refined grains, red meat, processed meat, and high-fat dairy products may promote the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in men.

We wished they would have added a third group into this study only eating whole food plant based!

Research Summary Information

  • 2002
  • van Dam RM, Rimm EB, Willett WC, Stampfer MJ, Hu FB.
  • Harvard School of Public Health, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
  • No, Free full text of study was not found.
  • No source of funding disclosure found
  • No potential conflicts disclosure found
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