Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of incident depression in midlife and older women.

Habitual intake of flavonoid-rich foods, such as citrus fruits, may lower the odds of suffering from depression in middle-aged and older women.

This study investigated the correlation between the consumption of dietary flavonoids and the likelihood of suffering from depression in women. Using validated food frequency questionnaires, researchers collated and analyzed data on the dietary flavonoid intake of 82,643 women between the ages of 36-80 years and with no previous history of depression.

The team of researchers observed that regular intake of foods rich in flavonols, flavonones, flavones, and proanthocyanins decreased the risk of developing depression. On the other hand, increased consumption of diets high in flavan-3-ols was found to have no significant effect on depression risk in this study. The findings of this study reveal that high dietary ingestion of favonoid rich foods may protect middle-aged and older women against depression.

Research Summary Information

  • 2016
  • Chang SC, Cassidy A, Willett WC, Rimm EB, O'Reilly EJ, Okereke OI.
  • Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, and. Department of Nutrition, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; and. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, and Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, and Departments of Nutrition and. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, and Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA ookereke@partners.org.
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
  • No source of funding disclosure found
  • No potential conflicts disclosure found
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  1. Marky Yvanovich

I find this very interesting. Is there any information on the actual study (links, name of the study, etc.)?

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  1. Sean Carney

Marky,

Thanks for the comment. We actually name these Research Summaries the exact same name as the study. So, in this case the actual name of the study is "Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of incident depression in midlife and older women."

We also build links, always hoping to find a link to a full version of the study. We add up to six links per study. In this case you will see that we were able to find a full text version of the study.

Here is a link to the full study: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/104/3/704.full.pdf+html

Sean

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  1. Marky Yvanovich    Sean Carney

I must have read the article before the links were added. ?

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  1. Sean Carney

Actually we always insert the links before publishing. But, it is possibly formatted in a way that it was not obvious there are links. Generally we are able to find links to full versions or at least abstracts of the studies. The one thing that is HARD to find is funding disclosures and potential conflicts of interest. I wish there was an easy way. There was an app awhile back written by some MIT students but it stopped working. :-)

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