Dietary fat intake as risk factor for the development of diabetes.

High consumption of dietary fat may elevate the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

This study examined the relationship between dietary fat consumption and type 2 diabetes development risk. Researchers analyzed the diets of 204 recently diagnosed diabetes (RDM) patients, 55 subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG), 42 subjects with undiagnosed diabetes (UDM), and a control group. Relevant demographic, anthropometric, and biochemical variables were assessed in each subject.

Researchers discovered that subjects in the RDM and UDM groups obtained the bulk of their energy from fatty foods (predominantly total and animal fat) rather than from carbohydrate sources. A lower plant to animal fat ratio was found in the diets of the RDM and UDM groups. According to this study, a family history of diabetes (except in the IFG group), lack of exercise, and sedentary jobs contributed positively to the development of diabetes in all the subjects. The results of this study support the view that high dietary fat intake is associated with the increased diabetes risk.

Research Summary Information

  • 2003
  • Thanopoulou AC, Karamanos BG, Angelico FV, Assaad-Khalil SH, Barbato AF, Del Ben MP, Djordjevic PB, Dimitrijevic-Sreckovic VS, Gallotti CA, Katsilambros NL, Migdalis IN, Mrabet MM, Petkova MK, Roussi DP, Tenconi MT.
  • Diabetes Center, 2nd Medical Department, Athens University Medical School, Hippokration Hospital, Greece.
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
  • Source of funding disclosure found
  • This study was financially supported by the MGSD, Novo Nordisk A/S, and Farmaserve Hellas.
  • No potential conflicts disclosure found
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