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Diet Soda Consumption and Risk of Incident End Stage Renal Disease.

​Habitual consumers of diet soda may have a high predisposition to developing end stage renal disease.

This study examined the relation between frequent consumption of diet soda and the occurrence of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Using validated food frequency questionnaires, researchers collected and assessed data on the sugary beverage consumption levels of 15,368 subjects recruited from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study cohort. The odds of having end stage renal disease were determined in all the subjects.

Researchers observed that the likelihood of developing end stage renal disease was high in regular consumers of diet soda. The authors concluded that high intake of diet soda may increase the incidence of end stage renal disease in the studied population.

Research Summary Information

  • 2017
  • Casey M. Rebholz, Morgan E. Grams, Lyn M. Steffen, Deidra C. Crews, Cheryl A. M. Anderson, Lydia A. Bazzano, Josef Coresh, and Lawrence J. Appel
  • Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Baltimore, Maryland; crebhol1@jhu.edu. Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Baltimore, Maryland. Divisions of Nephrology and. Division of Epidemiology & Community Health, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, California; and. Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana. General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
  • No. Source of funding disclosure not found
  • No. Potential conflicts disclosure not found
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