Caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis.

High consumption of caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee may reduce type 2 diabetes risk.

The objective of this research work was to determine the correlation between the consumption of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Researchers analyzed data obtained from 28 studies that examined 1,109,272 subjects and 45,335 type 2 diabetes cases. They found out that subjects who drank between 1-6 cups of caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee per day had slim chances of developing type 2 diabetes. The findings of this review reveal that high intake of caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee may decrease an individual's susceptibility to the development of type 2 diabetes.

Note: This is another study that seems to indicate that caffeine does not promote diabetes. Although other studies do indicate that caffeine makes it harder to keep blood sugar under control. 

Research Summary Information

  • 2014
  • Ding M, Bhupathiraju SN, Chen M, van Dam RM, Hu FB.
  • Corresponding author: Frank B. Hu, nhbfh@channing.harvard.edu.
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
  • Source of funding disclosure found
  • This research was supported by National Institutes of Health grant DK-58845.
  • No potential conflicts disclosure found
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