Association of Dietary Vitamin A and β-Carotene Intake with the Risk of Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 19 Publications.

Habitual consumption of foods loaded with vitamin A and beta-carotene may protect individuals against lung cancer.

This study examined high intake of foods rich in vitamins A and beta-carotene in relation to the development of lung cancer. Researchers conducted a meticulous meta-analysis on data extracted from 19 publications. They discovered that increased consumption of foods containing high amounts of vitamin A and beta-carotene decreased the risk of developing lung cancer. The results of this meta-analysis suggest that generous intake of foods high in vitamin A and beta-carotene may inhibit the development of cancerous cells and tumors in the lungs.

Research Summary Information

  • 2015
  • Yu N, Su X, Wang Z, Dai B, Kang J.
  • Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, No.155 Nanjing North Street, He-ping District, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, China. nayu888@yeah.net. Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, No.155 Nanjing North Street, He-ping District, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, China. xinmingsu123@yeah.net. Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, No.155 Nanjing North Street, He-ping District, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, China. zanfengwang123@yeah.net. Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, No.155 Nanjing North Street, He-ping District, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, China. bingdai123@yeah.net. Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, No.155 Nanjing North Street, He-ping District, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, China. kangjian58@163.com.
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
  • No source of funding disclosure found
  • No potential conflicts disclosure found
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  1. Chris Dove

Does that include animal foods that are rich in the Retinol form of A like liver, or just the plant foods?

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  1. Sean Carney

Chris,
You are asking a great question. In the full pdf version of this study at http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/7/11/5463/pdf there is no mention of meat. Vegetables and fruit are mentioned several times. But, since this study is really a meta-analysis of 19 publications there is always a chance that one of more of those studies could have not been purely plant based sources.
So, unfortunately we can't give you a definitive answer.
Thanks for asking this question.
Sean

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  Comment was last edited about 3 months ago by Sean Carney Sean Carney
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