A 21-day Daniel Fast with or without krill oil supplementation improves anthropometric parameters and the cardiometabolic profile in men and women.

Krill oil has no positive effects on several anthropometric, cardiovascular, and metabolic parameters in men and women during a 21-day Daniel fast.

This Daniel Fast was a vegan diet inspired by the Biblical story of Daniel which allowed the consumption of only plant-based foods throughout the fasting period. This research work was carried out to determine the effect of a 21-day Daniel Fast with or without krill oil supplementation on cardiovascular, metabolic, and anthropometric parameters in men and women. 39 subjects (27 women and 12 men) were made to follow a Daniel Fast dietary plan for 21 days. While the diet of some subjects was supplemented with krill oil, coconut oil was added to the diet of the remaining subjects (placebo group). The body weight, systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels of each subject were measured before and after the fast.

Researchers observed that the blood pressure, body weight, and serum concentrations of LDL-C, fasting blood glucose, and insulin were reduced in the placebo group at the end of 21-day fast. The same result was also observed in the krill oil group. The findings of this study show that a 21-day Daniel Fast may improve several cardiovascular, metabolic, and anthropometric variables in men and women, and krill oil has no effect on these improvements.

However, we wonder about the conclusions of this study because some form of oil was added to the diet of both groups. Had this study given one group added oil and one group no oil then we might expect to see a significant variation. This study seems to indicate that krill oil and coconut oil produced the same results. It does not seem to indicate that krill oil is not harmful.

Research Summary Information

  • 2012
  • Trepanowski JF, Kabir MM, Alleman RJ Jr, Bloomer RJ
  • Cardiorespiratory/Metabolic Laboratory, 161 Roane Field House, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, 38152, USA. rbloomer@memphis.edu.
  • Yes, Free full text of study was found:
  • Source of funding disclosure found
  • This work was funded by the University of Memphis.
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